If geeks love it, we’re on it

Digg brought to its knees for removing HD-DVD crack

Digg brought to its knees for removing HD-DVD crack

In what can only be described as a revolt, users of the top user-driven news portal on the ‘net, Digg.com, brought the site to it’s knees in a protest over the removal of information from the website. The information described how to circumvent HD-DVD keys. Bypassing HD-DVD keys would allow users to make backup copies of their discs, but also would allow unauthorized duplication for piracy reasons.

The Advance Access Content System (AACS), which provides the technology to make HD-DVD’s copy-proof, issued a cease and desist order after a Digg user posted links to a site describing how to bypass the copy protection. A message was posted on Digg by CEO Jay Adelson advising that they will be removing all links relating to the key after being served with a DMCA takedown notice.

Many Digg users were outraged at what they viewed as censorship and responded by repeatedly re-posting the link in new articles which numbered in the thousands. The front page of the site was bombarded with titles such as “Digg Punched me in the Face for Posting This.” The entire front page eventually became filled with anti-Digg references and hundreds of links to the HD-DVD code. Within a few hours Digg was overloaded with posts on the subject and users began receiving 404 messages when trying to visit the website.

Digg CEO Jay Adelson begged for restraint at one point, but after the uprising had continued for about eight hours Digg staff member Kevin Rose released a statement on the Digg company blog saying that they were throwing in the towel and would no longer delete references to the controversial key information:

“After seeing hundreds of stories and reading thousands of comments, you’ve made it clear. You’d rather see Digg go down fighting than bow down to a bigger company. We hear you, and effective immediately we won’t delete stories or comments containing the code and will deal with whatever the consequences might be.

If we lose, then what the hell, at least we died trying. Digg on.”

The AACS has not yet responded, but their DMCA takedown notice has ironically created an even greater awareness of the hack because of the backlash on Digg. The controversy has managed to make the front page of major news journals such as BBC News and Forbes and raises the question of just how far user-generated content can be censored.

Comments

  1. GooD
    GooD Hahah that's what can happen when people of a same community works together in the same goal ;)

    I like the last reply of Kevin Rose.

    I only hope that Digg won't get too much problems because of this. cuz This is a great news website !
  2. Lincoln
    Lincoln Viva la revolution.
  3. Medlock
    Medlock Wow that's awesome ;D
  4. RADA
    RADA :shakehead I find this sad.

    So they caved to pressure from posters who want to post code that will allow people to steal others intelectual property. And this is good thing?

    To me this "backup" copy BS has more holes in it than the Titanic. I've had CDs for 20 years now that play as well as they did day one.


    Hope S-M never caves to this type of pressure.
  5. Thrax
    Thrax I rip my video DVDs to my hard drive to have them on hand as a matter of convenience. I prefer to have my favorite movies at my fingertips, rather than having to rummage through my DVD library on another floor of my house.

    This is nothing but a good thing.
  6. Gargoyle
    Gargoyle It sucks to be in Digg's shoes though, RADA, because they'll be seen as caving in to whoever they side with.

    Personally, I rip all of my CDs on day one. I've had some get discs get broken, lost, or scratched up that I've regretted not backing up. Lesson learned.

    Like Thrax, I also find having DVDs on my hard drive is more convenient. It's kind of a pain, though, so I don't do it often.
  7. airbornflght
    airbornflght Yeh, usher in fair use. If I own a song, movie, or what have you. I feel that I have every right to make a backup for whatever purpose as I see fit. As long as I'm not selling, sharing, or broadcasting that backup then I feel I have committed no offense.

    I find it very empowering that the users were able to make their opinions known. I'm actually very tired of the RIAA, MPAA, et al that just act like industry bullies. I won't get into it further, but I feel that civil disobedience is the best thing in our current situation.
  8. profdlp
    profdlp
    airbornflght said:
    ...As long as I'm not selling, sharing, or broadcasting that backup then I feel I have committed no offense...
    I agree with that 100%.

    But, what do you do about the people who share three - or three-thousand - copies with their friends?
  9. Gargoyle
    Gargoyle
    profdlp said:
    I agree with that 100%.

    But, what do you do about the people who share three - or three-thousand - copies with their friends?
    Personally? Become one of their three thousand friends ;)

    If I were the content provider? Give up. The crack has already popped up on (stylish) t-shirts. Not that the FCKGW t-shirt changed anything for Microsoft, though.
  10. Jengo
    Jengo
    General Keebler said:
    Viva la revolution.
    you mean: viva la revolución

    :)
  11. Lincoln
    Lincoln I can find solutions to obscure PHP issues all day, but ask me to find the key combo for an accent and I get real lazy :p


    My favorite line regarding this: "Trying to take something off the Internet is like trying to take pee out of a pool" ;D
  12. BuddyJ
    BuddyJ The revolution will not be televised.
  13. shwaip
    shwaip
    Buddy Jesus said:
    The revolution will not be televised.
    It'll be on youtube?
  14. QCH
    QCH
    Gargoyle said:
    The crack has already popped up on (stylish) t-shirts. Not that the FCKGW t-shirt changed anything for Microsoft, though.
    The DVD T-shirt link has been pulled. ;D
  15. Gargoyle
    Gargoyle
    QCH2002 said:
    The DVD T-shirt link has been pulled. ;D
    Dang. I wanted one, but I figured they'd collect my $25AUD and have to use it to defend themselves in court ;D
  16. BuddyJ
    BuddyJ
    shwaip said:
    It'll be on youtube?
    The revolution will be on YouTube, your friendly neighborhood torrent, and possibly spammed to you by somebody claiming to be a missionary in Ethiopia. I expect it to be sold on the iTunes music store for $.99 just as soon as the Apple people figure out how to capitalize on it.
  17. GrayFox
    GrayFox
    Thrax said:
    I rip my video DVDs to my hard drive to have them on hand as a matter of convenience. I prefer to have my favorite movies at my fingertips, rather than having to rummage through my DVD library on another floor of my house.

    This is nothing but a good thing.
    Thank You Mr Thrax the voice of reason.

    I do the same thing with mine and I store them on my samba server for convent viewing on any machine in the house.

    For anyone who wants a more convenient way of ripping dvd's google "dvd rip vlc".

    Yes you can use everyones favorite video player to rip dvd's too.
  18. Medlock
    Medlock
    Buddy Jesus said:
    The revolution will not be televised.
    I see what you did there. :p
  19. Gargoyle
    Gargoyle
    QCH2002 said:
    The DVD T-shirt link has been pulled. ;D
    Now Thinkgeek has gotten in on the action with its own clever, if less colorful, design.

Howdy, ! Got something to say?