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Zambezi build

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  • Straight_ManStraight_Man Geeky, in my own way Punta Gorda, FL Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    Athlon 64 FX

    The Athlon 64 FX is positioned as a hardware enthusiast product, marketed by AMD especially toward gamers.[55] Unlike the standard Athlon 64, all of the Athlon 64 FX processors have their multipliers completely unlocked.[56] The FX line is now dual-core, starting with the FX-60.[57] The FX always has the highest clock speed of all Athlons at its release.[58] From FX-70 onwards, the line of processors will also support dual-processor setup with NUMA, named AMD Quad FX platform.

    Where: Excerpt from Wikipedia, search Google for wikipedia fx processor.

    At Thrax: Is this generally still true for Bulldozer/FX, chips? If you can't say yet then ok, but it would be nice to know at least sometime-- especially if the Bulldozer/FX chips still have unlocked multipliers. From the OC demo ( http://techreport.com/discussions.x/21628 ), they probably do.
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    The AMD FX is AMD's next-generation enthusiast processor based on the 32nm Bulldozer/Orochi architecture. AMD FX chips are codenamed "Zambezi." It is intended to replace the Phenom II Series of processors.

    All AMD FX processors are unlocked for overclocking.
  • csimoncsimon Acadiana Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    :facepalm:
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    As for spilling the beans, dear csimon:

    GQDk9.jpg
  • _k_k P-Town, Texas Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    A little late on the Chuck Testa uptake Thrax.
  • Cliff_ForsterCliff_Forster Baltimore, MD Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    I need to get on choosing an AM3+ board. :D
  • Straight_ManStraight_Man Geeky, in my own way Punta Gorda, FL Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    Thrax wrote:
    All AMD FX processors are unlocked for overclocking.

    Thanks for the confirmation about OCing FX.

    One other thing to mention for others than Thrax, lower power CPUs heat everything else less at multipliers that are unstable for higher power chips without more expensive than air cooling methods also applied-- meaning you can OC faster without overheating power circuitry as much (incrementally less overall heat in case too) and the chips stay cooler (less cooling needed at CPU and for case).

    Given that logic, you can OC FX more than other higher power consumption chips with just air cooling. Less overall cost to OC with a multiplier OC, and higher speed defaults for FX also with air cooling compared to what higher power consumption chips and other things need-- no expensive and somewhat tricky or very tricky to install extreme cooling (for same speed that higher power locked-multiplier chips need water or fluid cooling or passive peltier cooling or helium cooling to acheive stably).
  • fatcatfatcat Mizzou Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    AMD FX 8150/8120

    really? I can't wait to see the reason behind the 81xx naming scheme (8 core something-something)
  • Straight_ManStraight_Man Geeky, in my own way Punta Gorda, FL Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    Wikipedia excerpt: "Some manufacturers have announced that some of their AM3 motherboards will support AM3+ CPUs, after a simple BIOS upgrade.[10] Mechanical compatibility has been confirmed and it's possible AM3+ CPUs will work in AM3 boards, provided they can supply enough peak current. Another issue might be the use of the sideband temperature sensor interface for reading the temperature from the CPU. Also, certain power-saving features may not work, due to lack of support for rapid VCore switching.[11] Note that use of AM3+ CPUs in AM3 boards may not be officially supported by AMD."

    Simpler lLogic: This means that there may be core reasons not to try upgrading to a FX CPU of Bulldozer kind onto an AM3 socketted motherboard because to take full advantage of Bulldozer you need the AM3+ socket and circuitry to detect temp (to allow BIOS to shut down or slow down the Bulldozer/FX CPU if it overheats.) for example. The motherboards may also have to have more powerful power circuitry in order to support turbo mode-- faster running mode. The BIOS revision can cause a Bulldozer/FX chip to go into turbo mode, and that is all the overclocking some revised and flashed BIOSs on AM3 boards will do semi-automatically . Getting more out of the Bulldozer/FX needs a new motherboard or extensively revised one as well as BIOS software support.
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    Even simpler logic:

    Some socket AM3 motherboards will be unable to support AMD FX because they do not have the power circuitry required to deliver the correct amount of power to an FX chip at maximum load.

    Other AM3 motherboards can support AMD FX, but will do so with a reduced set of features: dynamic overclocking, temperature reading and low-power states may not work.

    A handful of AM3 boards may not have any of these problems.

    All AM3 boards will need a BIOS update to support FX.
  • mertesnmertesn I am Bobby Miller Yukon, OK Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    I need to get on choosing an AM3+ board. :D
    This: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128508
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    +1.
  • fatcatfatcat Mizzou Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    mertesn wrote:

    you really need the extra x8 lane over the UD5 for $60?
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    Ain't all about the PCIe lanes. More power phases and higher-quality parts allows for more stable overclocking at the upper end of a CPU's range.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Eagle River, Alaska Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    More power phases and higher-quality parts allows for more stable overclocking at the upper end of a CPU's range.
    Big, big, difference for stable overclocking.
  • csimoncsimon Acadiana Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    What makes the UD7 superior to the CHV? I've read that the CHV is slow to post, and that the UD7 has vdroop issues. I don't know if each issue is common to both. I do know that the CHV has UEFI bios which the UD7 doesn't.

    From a 24/7 stable overclock perspective I'd like your opinions since this is the only component I haven't purchased yet (aside from the zambezi). Quantity of video cards run in series is not my concern at this point ...and might never be.

    Thanks in advance,
    :csimon:
  • LeonardoLeonardo Eagle River, Alaska Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    I haven't looked at the boards in discussion, I just know from experience, just as Thrax wrote, that multi-power phase boards are better for sustained, high CPU overclocks. If you don't want to overclock, then you should let other features be the discriminating factors.
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    I honestly think it's a tossup between the CHV and the UD7. As I have had a frustratingly long string of poor/weird experiences with Asus products over the years, my money just goes to Gigabyte.
  • csimoncsimon Acadiana Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    Thrax wrote:
    I honestly think it's a tossup between the CHV and the UD7. As I have had a frustratingly long string of poor/weird experiences with Asus products over the years, my money just goes to Gigabyte.
    These have been my experiences too but I just haven't bought Gigabyte yet.
    On another note. Now that a release date has been revealed, when is the NDA lifted? :werr:
  • csimoncsimon Acadiana Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    Thrax wrote:
    When reviews appear online.
    Nvrmnd :crazy:
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    On another note, the official release date hasn't been revealed. The DonanimHaber and Lenzfire articles are not official.
  • Cliff_ForsterCliff_Forster Baltimore, MD Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    I was just considering the UD3 for $150.

    I'm not concerned if someones overlclock is 5% better than mine. Other than that, can we see any reason why I might regret saving the $100?
  • csimoncsimon Acadiana Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    I was just considering the UD3 for $150.

    I'm not concerned if someones overlclock is 5% better than mine. Other than that, can we see any reason why I might regret saving the $100?
    Have you considered a 990X or 970 version UD3? Just asking.
  • Cliff_ForsterCliff_Forster Baltimore, MD Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    csimon wrote:
    Have you considered a 990X or 970 version UD3? Just asking.

    One requirement I do have is two full bandwidth PCIE slots for crossfire. I think the $150 990FX boards are the least expensive that get me that.
  • Straight_ManStraight_Man Geeky, in my own way Punta Gorda, FL Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    True, Cliff, if that is supported by BIOS and hardware-- the more expensive FX boards can and often do provide robust graphics chips on-board that can be 3-way CrossfireX'd with two CrossfireX cards. If you do not want 3-way CrossfireX or cannot afford it, then by all means get a $150 dollar board, which will at least support 2-way CrossfireX if the FX chipset is used. Also, it depends on your requirements--- do your cards need two PCIe-16 slots? If so, many of the $150 boards have only one of those-- they have smaller PCIe slots(like PCIe-8, PCIe-1).

    Maybe a legacy PCI slot would come in handy for an old but powerul sound card also. I looked around in various places, and a lot of the $150 990FX chipset motherboards don't have that-- they often provide only PCIe slots.

    So look at specs if the manufacturer gives you that on their website or Newegg does-.If you did that, I am merely covering a base requirement that will also save lots of time because the detailled stuff is there and fine details impose limits that hide from anyone not doing that and asking questions about what they do not understand in them.

    John.
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    One requirement I do have is two full bandwidth PCIE slots for crossfire. I think the $150 990FX boards are the least expensive that get me that.

    I don't think there's anything inherently wrong with the UD3. You recognize your needs, and that's fine.
  • Straight_ManStraight_Man Geeky, in my own way Punta Gorda, FL Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    At Cliff-- For the motherboard you posted a link to, it does have the right PCIe setup you want for video and will support the FX CPUs and OCable DDR3/dual channel RAM (G.Skill makes that in 4GB-per-stick sizes now), and the board will support up to 32GB later when those 8GB per stick sizes of the proper kind become available. I did not see an onboard GPU in looking at the board at Newegg( using their photo blowup ability to see parts of the board), so probably only 2-way Crossfire or CrossfireX will work on that board. Full-bandwidth PCIe is supported by PCIe-16 as far as slot support and tracing support goes.
  • csimoncsimon Acadiana Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    Shouldn't this waterblock (Enzotech SCW-REV.A CPU Waterblock) fit on an AM3+ setup for my build??? Just thinking I would ask since it is the block I plan on using. Thanks in advance.
  • mertesnmertesn I am Bobby Miller Yukon, OK Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    I believe the socket mount hasn't changed since AM2. Should work.
  • _k_k P-Town, Texas Icrontian
    edited Sep 2011
    When AM2 launched was the last bracket change for AMD procs. It will assuming no clearance issues.
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