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Would like some advice with school

BlackHawkBlackHawk Bible music connoisseurThere's no place like 127.0.0.1 Icrontian
As some of you may or may not know I started taking classes at Ivy Tech (Indiana's state-wide community college system) last year. Everything's good so far but the thing is that I want to attend Indiana University–Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) and get a four year degree. That's not a problem. There's a program called Crossroads that allows me to start studying at Ivy Tech (which is cheaper) and finish at IPFW. The computer stuff I may want to study is not available with Crossroads but I can still take Gen-Ed classes at Ivy Tech and transfer those. Herein lies the problem. What do I study? I've got three options so far: Information Technology , Computer Engineering and Computer Engineering Technology.

My only bias is that IT seems like a clearer path. Takes less math and I already know what kind of certs the job needs. I know nothing about CE and CET. I don't know what I'd work in if I do get either of those degrees. Can someone tell me what kind of job a degree in that field would grant you? I don't know what to do.

My second problem is that I bombed the math placement exam when I entered Ivy Tech. It had been 10yrs since I had taken any math class and the hardest thing you do in the PR school system is pre-Algebra. Needless to say I'm rusty as hell. I would like to know if anyone knows of online resources to freshen up my math skills and learn more things needed for college so I can retake the placement exam and not have to do 4 semesters worth of Math just so I can be admitted to IPFW.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

Comments

  • shwaipshwaip bluffin' with my muffin Icrontian
    What do you want to do?

    khan academy / coursera are options, but imo the best thing to do to get you back on the math track is probably just to take classes.
  • BlackHawkBlackHawk Bible music connoisseur There's no place like 127.0.0.1 Icrontian
    shwaip said:

    What do you want to do?

    I don't know. What can I do with those degrees?

  • ardichokeardichoke Buttes Master B Lansing, MI Icrontian
    There are many things you can do with CE and CET degrees... most of them are very math heavy. If you don't enjoy math, you probably won't enjoy earning those degrees or doing the types of jobs you can do with them. Speaking only from my personal experience (namely, going to Michigan Tech and knowing a number of people got Computer Engineering degrees) typical jobs seem to revolve around designing digital systems for things like semi trucks, trains, consumer electronic devices, processors and pretty much anything else that involves an integrated circuit.
    kimono54
  • TushonTushon I'm scared, Coach Alexandria, VA Icrontian
    edited Jun 2013
    On each of your linked pages is a rather in-depth description of what that job role may do.

    IT: super broad, depends on what classes you take, but anything from all software jobs (development, database work, etc) to all hardware jobs (datacenter engineers) and lots in between (implementing networking equipment typically requires knowledge of physical systems and technical knowledge of programming design)
    CE: design and theory of computer systems (i.e. designing chips and hardware vs implementing servers)
    CET: "The B.S. in CPET program focuses on applications and application packages in areas of information technology and electronics to support information technology. This can be contrasted with Computer Engineering programs where the focus is on the theory and design of computer-based systems and Computer Science with a focus on computer program design"
    CET vs CE: CET is probably something like a cisco design engineer, actually designing/implementing hardware like a cisco switch while a CE would be thinking about chips to run it

    I could be totally wrong wololollol
  • mertesnmertesn I am Bobby Miller Yukon, OK Icrontian
    At Boeing (my employer) an engineering degree of almost any type qualifies for any entry level position.
  • NiGHTSNiGHTS San Diego Icrontian
    edited Jun 2013
    If I were entering the workforce today, and I wanted to tie IT into something I know is in high demand, it would revolve around data and database analysis - more likely an engineering type role with a minor in statistics.

    Data's essentially the new oil. Know how to use/compile/logically parse it, and you've got an ace in the hole.
    AnnesLinckimono54RyanFodder
  • shwaipshwaip bluffin' with my muffin Icrontian
    A lot of Computer Engineers do firmware programming / microcontroller design (not necessarily designing the controller, but how to use it in a circuit to do what you want). I've never heard of Computer Engineering Technology.

    You'll need a fair amount of math to get through the Computer engineering curriculum (depending on where you go). Definitely will need to be comfortable with calculus. Once you are out, how much math need depends on what you do.

    Don't do Computer engineering unless you like programming / problem solving.

    Looking at the course load, CET looks to be a hybrid between CE / ECE. Also, I don't want to drive you away from either, because I'm sure you can learn to do the math, but CE/CET will be heavy in math. (Calc, especially).
    kimono54
  • CrazyJoeCrazyJoe Winter Springs, FL Icrontian
    Blackhawk I have a Masters in teaching Math so I'd definitely be willing to help you with any math issues that you may have. Let me know.
    kimono54
  • PirateNinjaPirateNinja I don't know how to not Icrontian
    I agree fully with @NiGHTS. So some programming/data manipulation skills can get you far as an analyst, especially if you combine it with statistics/modeling. Finding patterns in data is invaluable to companies because it results in efficiencies that weren't available 20 years ago when data was still expensive. If you are the guy that can find those patterns with your magic skills that executives don't understand, you will become an asset to be bid for. If you go this route, the course load of CET looks most applicable but IT would probably also work here.

    I can't comment much on the CE route because I'm not at all involved in that industry, but there has to be a fair amount of demand for that in the computer hardware business and science/academic industries. So if you are more interested in manipulating machines and less interested in decision making science (data/modeling) then this is probably the way to go. It also looks the most math intensive.
    kimono54
  • BlackHawkBlackHawk Bible music connoisseur There's no place like 127.0.0.1 Icrontian
    Learning towards IT. I'll be sure once I take some math in school and know if my mind is up to the task.

    I've got a better idea of what the field of IT can offer me and I doubt Fort Wayne, IN has much of anything Computer Engineering related.

    Can anyone recommend some reading material about the IT field?

    Also would like some input from @shorty if possible.
  • BlackHawkBlackHawk Bible music connoisseur There's no place like 127.0.0.1 Icrontian
    CrazyJoe said:

    Blackhawk I have a Masters in teaching Math so I'd definitely be willing to help you with any math issues that you may have. Let me know.

    Can you recommend some online resources (even if paid) to freshen up and learn some new things? I'd like to think of myself as a fast learner.
  • drasnordrasnor Hawthorne, CA Icrontian
    As an aside, decent computer or electrical engineers that are also US citizens are highly desired in the aerospace industry. Rocket software and computers don't build themselves!
  • LincLinc Bard Detroit, MI Icrontian
    Don't stress about it too much, pick one, then be ready to change once you figure out what's going on.
    JBoogalookimono54
  • NiGHTSNiGHTS San Diego Icrontian
    Agreed. You never stop learning - you'll get into your field, start talking and making friends, and using what you learn to make career moves that'll make you happier.
  • CrazyJoeCrazyJoe Winter Springs, FL Icrontian
    BlackHawk said:

    Can you recommend some online resources (even if paid) to freshen up and learn some new things? I'd like to think of myself as a fast learner.

    Of course. Any specific subject? I'll get some sites together for you.
  • BlackHawkBlackHawk Bible music connoisseur There's no place like 127.0.0.1 Icrontian
    CrazyJoe said:

    BlackHawk said:

    Can you recommend some online resources (even if paid) to freshen up and learn some new things? I'd like to think of myself as a fast learner.

    Of course. Any specific subject? I'll get some sites together for you.
    Things you're supposed to know by the time you graduate HS?
  • PirateNinjaPirateNinja I don't know how to not Icrontian
    I'd agree with @shwaip and vote Khan, especially for stuff to know by time you graduate high school:
    https://www.khanacademy.org/

    more advanced math and engineering available here:
    http://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm

    kimono54
  • NullenVoydNullenVoyd Orlandish Icrontian
    I used Ivy Tech to finish some courses for the last degree, and both the in-class and online class were pretty neat. I tend to think trying to experience all sorts of different things is what school is all about, but there is something to be said for focusing on a goal and driving hard till you get it. *shrug*

    As someone who has a few basic computer certs, an associates in Electronics Technology, and a B.S. in Psychology, and works as a systems admin for a car auction - I can tell you I like my job but really wish I had focused on robotics and A.I. *shrugs some more, shoulders fall off*

    Haven't seen IPFW but when I lived in the area, Purdue proper was a neat campus and seemed well known for their engineering dept.
  • drasnordrasnor Hawthorne, CA Icrontian
    BlackHawk said:

    Things you're supposed to know by the time you graduate HS?

    What we SHOULD have been taught in our senior year of high school.
    PirateNinjacolakimono54
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