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a ruff day for american

oni_delsoni_dels Drunk French CanadianMontréal, Québec. Icrontian
obviously i'm not a new yorker, let alone an American.
but i remember that day, when i was in high school.
i use to drink my coffee (i started very early on that), watching the news before class.
i remember going to school and having class pretty much interrupted from their normal courses so people could discuss, and just talk and exchange thoughts.
i remember visiting NY last year, and seeing life sparkle and being constructed, reborn from ashes.
primesuspectUPSHitmanCreeperbane2Kwitko

Comments

  • Creeperbane2Creeperbane2 Victorian Scoundrel Indianapolis, IN Icrontian
    I was in elementary school, like first grade or so when the towers fell, didn't really know what happened until I got home, we were all caught unaware, but never again!
    Never Forget 9/11/2001
  • BandrikBandrik Elkhart, IN Icrontian
    edited Sep 2013
    I was in physics class in high school when it happened. The class was pretty big, a double-wide room with the typical slate desks on the outer border of the room. I was in the back corner, not really paying attention and bullshitting with a couple people near me.

    I look up and notice that most of the class was leaning forward and watching the news on the TV intently. The first tower had been struck. Then the other. I just remember thinking "oh... that's not good."

    Then the first collapse.

    "...oh..."

    I couldn't think much else. I don't even think it really dawned on me the significance of what I was literally watching unfold before my eyes. I guess that's what shock is.
    oni_dels
  • UPSLynxUPSLynx :KAPPA: Redwood City, CA Icrontian
    edited Sep 2013
    There was a moment in my experience during the unfolding events of 9/11 that I never really figured out until recently.

    I was in high school too, same school that @bandrik attended. We had just finished up the first class of the day and were packing to hit our lockers when the principal announced school-wide what had happened. At the time, both towers and the Pentagon were hit, and the first tower had collapsed. I remember seeing the shocked faces on everyone in the hall as I walked to my next class. Everyone was a zombie, completely shocked by the news. I passed by my best friend Norm (UPSYuri for those that play TF2) and we couldn't say anything to each other. He just starred back, shaking his head, fear in his eyes. I'll never forget that look.

    My next class was senior Engineering. We had televisions in all the classrooms, and I couldn't stop watching the news unfold on the TV or reading updated news on my workstation (we had in-class internet early on). My teacher, Mr. Dubois, was a teacher I had for multiple years of CAD, drafting, and design process. He started the day off with a quick talk about the events, but it was only about 30 seconds of talk, then he went right into lecture. I couldn't focus, and I thought it was distasteful for him to just breeze on by this tragedy and just getting back to classwork. How could he do that?

    A few minutes into lecture, we all watched as the second tower collapsed. Mr. DuBois glanced up from his lecture notes and said,

    "eh, the second one just went down? Yeah? Ugh. ..well. ..."

    And after a brief few seconds to collect himself, went right back to lecture. You could hear some students weeping. I was shocked.

    How could he do that??? How could he be so heartless and cold to just ignore this terrible waste of human life? We were UNDER ATTACK, and he just kept on teaching, acting like it was no big deal. I was so angry and disgusted with him. How DARE he treat this matter the way he did?

    Many many years after graduating high school and college, I still think back to that moment, especially on Sept. 11th. My mind often drifts back to myself sitting in the corner of the room, 10 browser windows of news up on my screen and NBC showing horrifying pictures on the television. And Mr. DuBois, just doing his thing, and trying to teach us engineering. And my ensuing anger at him for not taking it more seriously.

    It took many years of growing up, but I get it now. I know why he reacted the way he did. Mr. DuBois was making the best decision possible on how to deal with the situation. By maintaining a cool demeanor, and my keeping the normalcy of our academia, he made all of us calm. He helped every single one of us to relax and press on by doing what he did. None of us realized at the time, but Mr. DuBois' reaction and method was exactly what all of us needed, and it helped us immensely on that day. He knew exactly what he was doing and how to handle that incredibly tough situation, and now I have nothing but respect for that man.

    I wish I could find him and thank him for that.
    PirateNinjaBandrikGnomeQueenmidga
  • AlexDeGruvenAlexDeGruven Wut? Meechigan Icrontian
    Also quite likely that he was having his own internal freak-out and by focusing on the topic at hand, he was able to keep his own composure.

    That's the way I tend to handle extremely stressful situations. I hold it in during the event and when I need to maintain composure (like in front of my kids, etc), and let it out later.
  • PirateNinjaPirateNinja Icrontian
    I sort of wish I would have hung around in high school to see how everyone reacted. I was in California and watching the news in the morning before I went to school. The first tower went down just before I walked to school.
    As soon as I got out of my first class I jumped the fence and walked right back home, where I sat glued to the tv for 12 hours.

    The profoundly odd thing for me was how bad I wanted revenge on anything. Of course I was young and stupid, but it is still shocking to me how that string of events swept logic right under the table for a good 6 months before I actually started my long journey in to rationality.
  • TushonTushon I'm scared, Coach Alexandria, VA Icrontian

    The profoundly odd thing for me was how bad I wanted revenge on anything. Of course I was young and stupid, but it is still shocking to me how that string of events swept logic right under the table for a good 6 months before I actually started my long journey in to rationality.

    Too bad it wasn't just young and stupid people that reacted that way.
  • JBoogalooJBoogaloo This too shall pass... Alexandria, VA Icrontian
    The only thing that really stings a bit on 9/11 is my buddy Kris. After he transferred from our ship he ended up working along the wall where the Pentagon was hit (what luck, right?). He was only there maybe 2 or 3 weeks...I haven't been to his grave in a while, but after reading these, this weekend Ill be dropping by Arlington with a brew...just to say hi.
    oni_dels
  • GnomeQueenGnomeQueen The Lulz Queen Mountain Dew Mouth Icrontian
    JBoogaloo said:

    The only thing that really stings a bit on 9/11 is my buddy Kris. After he transferred from our ship he ended up working along the wall where the Pentagon was hit (what luck, right?). He was only there maybe 2 or 3 weeks...I haven't been to his grave in a while, but after reading these, this weekend Ill be dropping by Arlington with a brew...just to say hi.

    I'm so sorry, Jason.
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