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The ultimate Windows 7 FAQ

ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch SlutToronto, ON Icrontian
edited Nov 2009 in Technology

Comments

  • edited Oct 2009
    I was trying to install defender in windows 7 home premium and a dialog box opened and said windows VISTA already has defender installed, go to my webpage on google for proof Windows 7 is a service pack at:

    http://sites.google.com/site/windows7isavistasevicepack/
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch Slut Toronto, ON Icrontian
    edited Oct 2009
    Right symptoms, wrong interpretation.

    Windows Vista and Windows 7 share the same major kernel version number of 6.x. That means both OSes appear to be Windows NT version 6.x to program installers. However, Windows Vista is version 6.0, and Windows 7 is version 6.1. Most installers are only trained to look for 5 (Windows XP) or 6 (Vista), as it was not expected that the company would use 6.1 for the next version of Windows. Program installers which are not trained to look at the number after decimal will think Vista and 7 are the same OS, as Defender has done.

    What you evidently don't know is that Windows 7 was originally scheduled to be versioned Windows NT 7.0. The changes are that significant. Microsoft didn't do this precisely because so many app installers do version checking, and upping the version number to 7.x would break a lot of existing applications.
  • AlexDeGruvenAlexDeGruven Not as tall as Bobby Tallbeer. Twilight Sparkle is overrated. Meechigan Icrontian
    edited Oct 2009
    Nice work. Can't wait to see this doc evolve. Still in awe at how well 7 works with all of my hardware, both physical and virtual. I even liked Vista somewhere around Snarky's level, and I think 7 was a fantastic jump forward.

    Also,nice job at addressing without feeding the troll.
  • FelixDeSouzeFelixDeSouze UK New
    edited Oct 2009
    You didn't include whether it made breakfast or my bed. I'm gutted
  • edited Oct 2009
    Windows 7 codename was Windows Vienna.
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch Slut Toronto, ON Icrontian
    edited Oct 2009
    Not really true. Windows Blackcomb was supposed to succeed Whistler (Windows XP), but the project's timetable went wildly off course. Longhorn (Vista) was supposed to be a minor refresh, but got bumped up to a full release of Windows. When work on Blackcomb resumed in 2006 it used the Vienna codename, but by the time Windows 7 development had started in 2007, Vienna had officially been renamed to Windows 7 internally.
  • chrisWhitechrisWhite Littleton, CO
    edited Oct 2009
    hmm, I think I would stipulate that if users are using a laptop and they regularly access public and non-corporate private networks they should leave the Windows 7 firewall on when not connected to their home or work networks.

    Great article man, very thorough!
  • edited Oct 2009
    Wondered if anyone else was noticing problems when you copy file(s) (using windows explorer) from the hard drive over to a usb flash pen, then at times it will just suddenly stop coping about 1/2 way and then say it can't "see" the target drive and just stop(the flash pen anymore) which leads to a reboot. I'm using Windows 7 Ultimate, 64bit on an HP m9517c machine with all the updates. Seems very strange. Also happens when backing up data to the push in media drives.

    Any solutions? (BTW - I have tried melting down 4 different times, no upgrading...)
  • AlexDeGruvenAlexDeGruven Not as tall as Bobby Tallbeer. Twilight Sparkle is overrated. Meechigan Icrontian
    edited Oct 2009
    chrisWhite said:
    hmm, I think I would stipulate that if users are using a laptop and they regularly access public and non-corporate private networks they should leave the Windows 7 firewall on when not connected to their home or work networks.

    Great article man, very thorough!
    You can set firewall policy based upon 2 different conditions: Work/Home, and Public (covering the 3 different network types that MS has defined). On my systems, I have my home network defined as a Home network and have the firewall turned off for them (since I"m behind a hardware router), but for public networks, it's on.

    Really thoughtful design on that setup, makes it a bit easier to get all the little features that require different holes in the firewalls to work properly.
  • ZuntarZuntar North Carolina Icrontian
    edited Oct 2009
    Very nice Robert sir!!
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Pokémaster, Watch Slut Toronto, ON Icrontian
    edited Oct 2009
  • McBainMcBain San Clemente, CA Icrontian
    edited Oct 2009
  • edited Nov 2009
    Jetkat, this should solve your problem: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/976972
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