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Skillz

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  • ardichokeardichoke Buttes Master B Lansing, MI Icrontian
    edited Aug 2010
    image

    Here's ur risotto. Totally not mine, looks better than mine did.

    EDIT: Damnit... now I'm hungry.
  • TushonTushon I'm scared, Coach Dallas Icrontian
    edited Aug 2010
    Om nom grom nommm
  • CantiCanti =/= smalltime http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9K18CGEeiI&feature=related Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    buuuuuuuuuump

    We require more skillz!
  • TushonTushon I'm scared, Coach Dallas Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    One day, I'll start posting like a wine snob ... been on a little binge of buying recently and got some shelving etc.
  • colacola the dick man himself Right behind you Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Does being able to fight like a man count?
  • TushonTushon I'm scared, Coach Dallas Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Pics/videos with links to science!

    *Cave Johnson*Cave here, today we are gonna learn about ass-kicking. The first rule of ass-kicking is to stop being such a little bitch
  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    What to do if you fall from a seagoing vessel:

    1. Remain calm, panicking will not help. As you fall, if there's time, shut your eyes and mouth, and cover your face with your hands. You know what the first response of a person hitting water (especially cold) is? Gasping, and try to suck air. And that's not a good idea when you're under water, for obvious reasons. It's the same reaction as if someone suddenly pours a bucket of ice water over you, times three.

    2. Try to kick or push away from the ships hull. The hull of a moving vessel will create suction, and you could get sucked under. Or not, depending on size and speed of the vessel.
    3. Hope someone has seen you fall.

    4. If a lifebuoy is thrown out, try to make your way to it. There is a chance that this buoy is attached to a light and smoke device. Try to avoid the smoke, it's somewhat poisonous, but it's still better than drowning.

    5. If you're close to the shore, depending on your physical shape, try to swim. If too far from the shore (over 500 meters, roughly quarter of a mile), stay where you are. Assume the fetal position. It will help you conserve body heat. If clothes start dragging you down, get rid of them. Otherwise, try to keep as much clothes on as possible. Move as little as possible. If you feel that you start sinking, alternate between using your feet and legs to keep afloat. If that's not enough, use both. DO NOT try to move to "keep warm". It will only increase the flow of water around you, which will cool you down faster, and it'll fatigue you.

    6. In rough seas, try to keep your back to the waves. Use a hat or piece of clothing to cover your face. Not so you can't breathe, but enough to not get splashed too often.

    7. If a helicopter or ship/boat comes to your rescue, wave and scream. If they don't see you, assume the fetal position again and wait. At least now you know they're looking.
    If/when they spot you, lie on your back and wait. If they have they slightest clue about their job, they'll do all the work for you. Don't try to enter the rescue craft by yourself. Trust that they have a plan for you.

    8. NEVER GIVE UP!

    I have been involuntarily in the water several times, and the above tips are based on personal experience. Feel free to add or comment if you feel I've missed something.


  • BandrikBandrik Elkhart, IN Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Jokke, the fact that these tips came from personal experience only continues to bolster my respect for you. I've never really given too much thought to what I'd do if I fell overboard significantly far away from shore (I've been on many boats, but generally smaller ones and seldom more than a few miles from land). Thanks for the tips!
  • primesuspectprimesuspect HumanGarbageDisposal Detroit, MI Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    This post could literally save someone's life someday. Thanks for making it.
  • TushonTushon I'm scared, Coach Dallas Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    One thing you could add, is that if there are multiple people in the water and you are staying calm while the other(s) is not ... do not try to help them right away or you will risk both of you going down. That scene in "The Guardian" where Ashton Kutcher elbows his superior in the nose to knock him out is relevant, but I can't find a pic
  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Good point Tushon. There are multiple techniques you can use to rid yourself of an assailant/panicking victim, unfortunately none of which I can describe in words. I can show them at the Expo. But, when in doubt, punch or kick.
    I could also add that if there are more persons in the water, you could make a buddy chain. Lie on your backs, and drag a person up between your legs, so his/her head is resting on your stomach. Repeat until everyone is in the chain. One person will always be lying close to water, not resting his head on someone. Make sure to rotate that position one every few minutes.
    image

    Bad pic, taken from this thread! :D
  • colacola the dick man himself Right behind you Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    A good idea for ridding yourself of a panicing victim is to turn your head to the side, grab them, and (I know this sounds counter intuitive, but it definitely works) slip/push yourself downwards. A panicking drowning victim wants desperately to keep on the surface, and they won't cling to you if you go down. Just make sure to come back up :D
  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Wow, cola, that's almost word for word how our teacher explained it to us during my surface swimmer course. Thanks for describing what I couldn't.

    On to the next subject:

    Basic CPR for n00bs:

    Scenario: You find a person, lying on the ground.
    The following procedure is for an adult person.

    1. Call 911. Inform them of WHO you are, WHERE you are and WHAT you are dealing with. They will guide you through these same steps. You'll need both hands for this, so put them on speaker, and put your phone nearby so you can hear and talk.

    2. Check your surroundings. Is there anything immediately threatening to you nearby (fire, traffic, violent crowds, etc)? If yes, remove yourself and, if possible, the victim from the source of danger. YOUR safety is the most important thing; how can you expect to save someone if you get hurt yourself? If no threats, move on.

    3. Check the person for signs of consciousness. Yell, and give a few slaps in the face. Pinch under the bicep, on a nipple or on the inside of the thigh. If no reaction, move on. I will not cover what to do if person reacts.

    4. Check for breathing.
    Put one hand on each side of the jawbone and tilt head backwards (jaw upwards). Open mouth by putting one hand on the forehead and the other on the chin. Look for foreign objects. If the tongue is far back in the throat pull it up. This is to make sure the airways are free. Put one hand on the chest, put your ear very close to the persons mouth, and look down on the chest. Hold that position for up to a minute. A person may be breathing extremely shallow and slowly, as low as 4 times a minute in extreme cases. If no breathing detected, move on.

    5.
    OK, person is not conscious and not breathing, time to start CPR. Remove thick clothing, if possible, expose the persons bare chest. No time to be shy. Place the palm of one hand between the nipples. If the nipples for some reason ain't placed on the chest, locate the approximate middle.
    Now place your other hand on top of the first hand, and put the fingers between each other. Place your upper body directly above your joined hands. Use your upper body to push straight down about 4-5 centimeters (2 inches). Do this 30 times. The rhythm should be about 100 compressions a minute. that is almost (but not quite) 2 compressions per second! What you're doing now is actually manually pumping the heart. When you push down, you push blood out of the heart and out to the rest of the body. When you release, new blood is sucked into the heart. Blood carries oxygen into the body, and this prevents cells from dying. You're literally keeping this person artificially alive. But, the blood will run out of oxygen. Time to add some more. Moving on!

    6. Let go of the chest. Move over to the persons face. Check to see that the head is still tilted backwards.
    If you suspect substance abuse, you see foam around the mouth, or you suspect that the person has swallowed acid, use some sort of filter. There are filters designed specifically for this purpose, available at any pharmacy. They're small and cheap and can be carried anywhere. If you are in doubt that this is safe, don't do it! As I said earlier, it's no good if you get hurt too. Close the persons nostrils by pinching his nose using two fingers. Grab the chin to open the persons mouth. Use your own mouth to completely cover his/hers. Take a sideways glance towards the persons chest and blow gently and steadily. SEE that the chest inflates. Remove your mouth and put your ear to the persons mouth. Hear that air is flowing out, while you see that the chest deflates. Now give one more blow, same procedure. If the persons chest fails to inflate, something is blocking the airways. Again, make sure the head is tilted back, and use your fingers to feel if there are any foreign objects in the throat. Remove any objects and try again. Do not blow too hard or too long. Doing this forces air into the stomach when the lungs are full. As that air rushes out again, it could bring stomach contents (read: vomit) with it, and you have to clear that before you proceed.
    SHOULD you have the rare occurrence that blowing through the mouth isn't possible (jaw missing, your lips too small to cover the whole mouth) you can just as easily cover the mouth, and blow through the nose.

    7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 until help arrives. It's quite hard to do this for a prolonged period, but keep at it and don't give up. You just may save this persons life. If there are two or more of you, you could split the jobs. One focuses only on compressions, and one solely on blowing. This however requires timing and communication.

    Afterthoughts: It's not unheard of for ribs to break during the compressions. However, do try to avoid it. It's still better to be alive with some broken ribs, than to be dead with an intact ribcage.
    DO NOT expect the person to magically wake up during CPR. You're just keeping circulation going until trained medical professionals arrive. The only time I can imagine someone waking up is if drowning is a factor in this all. Still, I wouldn't count on it.
    Under usual circumstances always start doing the compressions. Most of the time, a person will have sufficient levels of oxygen in their blood to eliminate the need to add more. The only time it's advised to give oxygen first, is if the person has been submerged in water.

    Let it be known that I'm NOT employed within the health sector, and that this guide is purely theoretical. Any use of these tips in a live situation will be at own risk. I HIGHLY recommend anyone to take a class lead by a professional. These steps are a result of me taking many such classes.
  • TushonTushon I'm scared, Coach Dallas Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    CPR training classes are not expensive and totally worth the investment if you only use it once.

    Addendum to one: If there is a crowd, pick one person and tell them they are going to call 911 ... never leave it to the crowd to decide that, because no one will act ... fucking mob effect.
  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Yeah, thanks for pointing that out, Tushon. Also make sure the crowd keeps its distance and don't get in the way. People will always wanna watch this kinda thing, but not even think about helping.
  • colacola the dick man himself Right behind you Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Yea, I'm a lifeguard lol, or was. Not doing that as a job this summer, too much of a workday with my other job :P

    Still have the first aid and CPR down though.
  • CantiCanti =/= smalltime http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9K18CGEeiI&feature=related Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    There's also some way to make a half-assed flotation device out of your pants. Can't remember exactly how though.
  • RyderRyder Kalamazoo, Mi Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Canti said:
    There's also some way to make a half-assed flotation device out of your pants. Can't remember exactly how though.
    Tie knots in the legs then bunch up the waist and plunge it under water. The knots keep the air in.
  • CantiCanti =/= smalltime http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9K18CGEeiI&feature=related Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    RyderOCZ said:
    Tie knots in the legs then bunch up the waist and plunge it under water. The knots keep the air in.
    Someone deserves their lifesaving merit badge more than I do.
  • BasilBasil Nubcaek IREEELAND Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011

    Just to add, there are two situations were it is generally accepted a first aider should administer medications:

    Anaphylaxis - wheezing, hives/itching and swelling around the throat or mouth.
    If the patient has an epinephrine autojet and is unable use it you should do so for them.
    Technique is simple, make a fist around the autojet with one hand, remove the plastic endcap and press firmly into the outer thigh for a count of 10 before releasing.

    Myocardial Infarction (Heart attack) - Crushing chest pain that may radiate to the shoulders/arms and neck/jaw, gasping for breath, sweating,
    light headed or dizziness.
    If alert, give 300mg Aspirin for them to chew.


    One other thing to be aware of when it comes to MIs is the availabilty of AEDs.
    Though training is reccommended these machines can be used by anyone in an emergency, just place the two pads (one on the upper right of the chest and the other on the left side) and give a 'clear' confirmation if prompted to allow a shock.
    The units sense for a shockable rhythm automatically and won't fire unless they detect one.
    Jokke said:
    If you suspect substance abuse, you see foam around the mouth, or you suspect that the person has swallowed acid, use some sort of filter.

    I'd go farther, always use one, having someone vomit into your mouth is not something you ever want to experience.
    IIRC the red cross give away 'face shields' or you can buy one for a quid.

  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    How to drink like a typical Norwegian:

    1. Stay away from all alcohol during the weekday, including after work. It's immoral to drink during weekdays in Norway. If you do, you're an alcoholic and should seek help.

    2. Weekend means drinking. Friday afternoon, buy crates upon crates of beer. Remember, the amount of fun you have is directly proportional to the amount of alcohol you consume. Also remember to go to "Vinmonopolet" before 18:00 to get some booze. Doesn't matter if it's cheap, it'll just have to get you drunk. Brag to everyone you see about how crazy drunk you're gonna get.

    3. Start drinking around 5-6pm. A typical Norwegian night out consists of three stages: "Vorspiel", German, means foreplay. This is the best time to bring out the wine and the booze you bought. Mix strong drinks, even better, do shots! Shots are always the highway to win! You can drink beer too, but you need to really pour it down to keep up with the boozers. Do this 'till around 12-01am. Now you hit the town!

    4. When out at clubs or bars in Norway, there are no rules. You can grab girls tits and pick a fight with the doorman, it's all good! Just remember to drink heavily between the fights. If you're not seeing triple at this point, you've failed. Be ashamed of yourself. Bars close between 2-3am, so when the lights flash, sprint up to the bar and order a two-digit number of shots. This is your last chance to prove yourself a true hero. If the bartender refuses, start complaining loudly to the entire bar. It's mandatory to buy a dodgy kebab that you'll regret on the toilet tomorrow. If you feel the need to vomit (pussy!) at this point, feel free to do so on the street. It's what it's there for. If the police show up, yell angrily at them. That'll scare them off. Start looking for stage three of the night, nachspiel. It's ok to ask total strangers to come home with them. If you really wanna be a hero, throw a nachspiel at your own place.

    5. Nachspiel. Quite similar to vorspiel, bring out anything alcoholic and drinkable. The night is almost over, you need to make this final push. Don't bother watering out drinks. Pass out.

    6. Repeat steps 3-5 on Saturday. Ignore the feelings you may have from yesterday. Deal with them on Sunday.

    7. Spend all Sunday in bed feeling sorry for yourself.

    8. At work on Monday, brag about how drunk you were on Friday and Saturday. Remember, anyone who wasn't drunk, is a sad, pathetic loser without a life. Beat him/her with a stick. Keep bragging 'till Wednesday. After lunch on Wednesday, it's about time to start bragging about how drunk you're gonna be the coming weekend.
    Start looking forward to the weekend.


  • primesuspectprimesuspect HumanGarbageDisposal Detroit, MI Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    So, then... A typical event at ICHQ...
  • MAGICMAGIC Furniture City, Michigan Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Damn it, I was born in the wrong country.
  • edited Apr 2011
    I make an amazing grilled cheese (and ham, turkey, etc) sandwich. I'll think about doing a demo
  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    How to properly send a Maritime Radio Distress/Urgency Signal

    These are two different messages you can send over VHF or MF/HF voice radio if you're out at sea and suddenly find yourself in trouble.
    First off, the "Urgency" signal.

    This is a signal that you would send out if you're in trouble, but there is no immediate threat to the vessel. This could be propulsion or steering trouble, non threatening grounding, imminent collision with another vessel or a man over board situation.

    Switch to VHF channel 16, or HF frequency 2182.0.
    Push the transmit button and slowly and calmly utter the following:
    "-Pan-Pan, Pan-Pan, Pan-Pan.
    -All stations, all stations, all stations OR the name/callsign of the station you're trying to reach
    -This is *insert type, name and callsign (
    remember to use the Phonetic Alphabet) of own vessel here* x3
    -In Position *Your own position (in longtitude and latitude)* x3
    -I have *State emergency and type of assistance needed*"

    EXAMPLE: "Pan-Pan, Pan-Pan, Pan-Pan. Norwegian Coastguard, Norwegian Coastguard, Norwegian Coastguard. This is cargo carrier Icrontic, Icrontic, Icrontic, Callsign; India, Charlie, Hotel, Quebec,
    India, Charlie, Hotel, Quebec, India, Charlie, Hotel, Quebec. (ICHQ x3). I'm in position 4-2 degrees, 4-7 point 6 minutes north, repeat 4-2 degrees, 4-7 point 6 minutes north. 0-8-3 degrees, 0-5 point 5 minutes west, repeat 0-8-3 degrees, 0-5 point 5 minutes west.
    My engine has stopped and I require tow to port."

    Someone will probably contact you, and arrange for assistance.

    Second, and more important, the distress radio message. This is only to be used if ship AND crew are in grave and imminent danger. Examples are fire, heavy listing/capsizing, taking on water, drifting close to shore.

    Switch to VHF channel 16, or HF frequency 2182.0.
    Push the transmit button and slowly and calmly utter the following:

    "-Mayday, Mayday, Mayday
    -This is *type, name and callsign of own ship* x3"

    Release the transmit button and wait for about a minute. This is to give other vessels time to get ready to receive your mayday. If you feel you don't have time, skip this step!
    Push the transmit button again and slowly and calmly utter the following:
    "-Mayday (only once)
    -This is
    *type, name and callsign of own ship (only once)*
    -In Position *Your own position (in longtitude and latitude)* x3
    -I have *State emergency and eventually type of assistance needed*
    -Any other info critical to the rescue personell, such as number of people onboard, going into rafts, etc."

    Example: "Mayday, Mayday, Mayday.
    This is cargo carrier Icrontic, Icrontic, Icrontic, Callsign; India, Charlie, Hotel, Quebec, India, Charlie, Hotel, Quebec, India, Charlie, Hotel, Quebec. (ICHQ x3)."

    Pause or skip.

    "Mayday. This is Icrontic,
    Callsign; India, Charlie, Hotel, Quebec.
    I'm in position 4-2 degrees, 4-7 point 6 minutes north. Repeat 4-2 degrees, 4-7 point 6 minutes north. 0-8-3 degrees, 0-5 point 5 minutes west. Repeat 0-8-3 degrees, 0-5 point 5 minutes west. I have a fire onboard, require pumps and firefighter assistance. There are 10 people onboard, all accounted for. We are preparing lifeboat to abandon ship."

    Repeat second step until you get a response or you're forced to abandon the ship. Inform that you are abandoning ship.
    Be aware, false distress signals are expensive for you, and only to be used in real emergencies. Also notice that this is just the two most basic signals to send, and that there are many more codewords to be used in distress traffic. If you know how to use these two signals, you've got the most important things covered.

    I'm a certified maritime radio operator, and these were things we drilled during our course.

    There's also a slightly delayed easter egg in here, see if you can find it..




  • BandrikBandrik Elkhart, IN Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Knowing how to send a distress emergency signal can be crucial. Again, great tips Jokke!

    As for the easter egg, my best guess is that it's hidden in one (or both) of the examples.

    Name: Icronitc
    Callsign: ICHQ
    Position: 42° 47.6' N, 83° 5.5' W [GOOGLE MAP] — general ICHQ location

    Was that it? :D
  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Bandrik is the winner! Although the link you provided, doesn't show ICHQ.
  • UPSLynxUPSLynx The Dean of Computer Graphics Redwood City, CA Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Hahahaha!

    This thread is incredible. Keep going guys. You're all heroes.
  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    Probably the wrong time to write this but:

    Tips and tricks to dress in cold weather:

    1.
    Stay dry. Wet clothing are less insulating and you will lose body heat much faster. Replace any wet or moist clothing if possible. A tip to dry wet clothing in subzero temperatures is to leave it outside overnight, and then shake off the now frozen water.

    2. Think layers. The inner layer, closest to your skin, should be airy and breathing. Think wool, terry(sp?) or less preferable, synthetics. Wool is my favorite. It doesn't get cold even if it's wet, it traps a lot of air, and it's soft and relatively light. Modern wool blends doesn't even itch. Airy, because your body heat warms the air and it stays that way with proper clothing. Cotton is very illegal!
    The middle layer should be insulating, trapping hot air inside and leaving cold air outside. Fleece is excellent for this. Wool is good too, but is less efficient due to its airyness.
    The outer layer should have one main function; keeping the elements out! This goes back to staying dry. If you let the wind howl through your levels of wool and whatnot, the heat you've been saving up will be blown away and replaced by icy cold. A good shell jacket will do wonders. The perfect jacket let's excess heat evaporate, while keeping water out.

    3. Wear some form of hat. Up to 70% of your body heat escapes from shoulders and head. Same principles apply here. It should keep the warm in and the wind and water out.

    4. Hands should also be protected. Gloves are OK, but if you don't need to use your fingers, mitts are king. By keeping your fingers together in one space, the share heat. Separate them, and they can only heat themselves. They should be insulated and waterproof. Feel free to combine two pair of gloves for additional insulation. The inner one of wool, and the outer of waterproof material.

    5. Feet. There are many, MANY good shoes on the market, but find a pair that breathes out all that damp foot sweat. A wet foot is a cold foot, and a cold foot WILL make you miserable, no exceptions. They should also be of a good fit. Tight shoes will not keep you warm for long. The trick here is to buy a shoe one size up from what you usually use, and put on an extra pair of socks. Example: I'm a euro size 45/46. My army boots are size 47. They are made of leather, and are not insulated a lot (thin layer of felt on the inside). The last exercise I was on was in January. We had at the lowest -47 decrees Celsius. I put on two pairs of woolen socks and wasn't cold on my feet one for the two weeks the exercise lasted.
    There are also specially designed "foot bags", that looks like a shoe that goes outside your normal shoe for extra insulation (example). For socks, cotton is still very illegal.

    6. Your face should also be protected if there is a lot of wind or extremely low temperatures. I've frozen my cheeks three times because of insufficient protection. Believe me, it's not pleasant. A thick scarf can be nice, but people won't hear what you're saying and some can get difficulty breathing. I find the Buff(tm) to be an excellent product. They come in all sorts of variants for different conditions. I think I have 7 or 8 different ones at home. They're also quite versatile. The army has also issued me with a shemagh, which I find very comfortable in cold weather. For complete protection, a balaclava could be used. Just remember that a lot of moist collects around the mouth and nose when covered, which in extreme temperatures could lead to frost damage.

    General notes: The layers should be a good fit. None of them should be too tight, but not to bulky either. Also consider your activity level. When sitting completely still for hours, for instance on a snow mobile or on guard duty, you can add up to two basic layers and two or three middle layers. This is something you need to consider yourself. For times with a high level of activity, some layers can be skipped completely. On the aforementioned exercise we had to carry a guy on a stretcher for hours and hours. As we carried him and we got hotter and hotter we took of our clothes. In the end, all I was wearing was my shell jacket, and I was still warm.
    Also consider; "Too warm and too cold are both equally bad" -Joakim Larsen, Icrontic member.

    These are just my personal opinions and experiences, feel free to add or comment with own experiences.
  • colacola the dick man himself Right behind you Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    I'm from Northern Minnesota, 60 degrees below Fahrenheit is sweatshirt weather.
  • CantiCanti =/= smalltime http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9K18CGEeiI&feature=related Icrontian
    edited Apr 2011
    primesuspect said:
    So, then... A typical event at ICHQ...
    NNNNNNNNNNNNNNOOO!

    We have Rock Band. That's a huge difference.
  • fatcatfatcat Mizzou Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    Jokke, you guys ever make bottle rockets out of MRE's? (assuming you even have MRE's)

    Basic thought is tobasco bottle, non-dairy creamer (highly flamable with right mixture), match heads, and an open area ;)
    JBoogaloo
  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    No, we use freeze-dried field rations. No creamer or tabasco bottles in them.. Awesome idea though, I'd like to see that in action.
  • colacola the dick man himself Right behind you Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    I am intrigued by this bottle rocket idea, can you go more in depth into a design?
  • djmephdjmeph Detroit Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    I have an MRE, I'll bring it to Expo Icrontic.
  • fatcatfatcat Mizzou Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    djmeph said:
    I have an MRE, I'll bring it to Expo Icrontic.
    haha, alright. we'll need a few (5-10) book of matches also.
  • djmephdjmeph Detroit Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    I'm not Jesus.
  • CharshieCharshie Hollywood, California Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    Jokke! I loved your knots videos so much! Bravo sir.
  • BobbyDigiBobbyDigi ? R U #Hats ! SoCal Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    Request: How to Draw MLP

    -Digi
  • ardichokeardichoke Buttes Master B Lansing, MI Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    Wicked Awesome Chili Mac (or my culinary experiment with the ingredients I had available to me last night)

    What you need

    1 taco seasoning pack
    1 lb ground beef
    1 box mac and cheese
    salsa
    milk
    butter
    chili powder
    paprika
    cumin
    ground red pepper

    Prepare ground beef according to directions for your taco mix. Mix in salsa (I used about half a regular sized jar). Add in chili powder, paprika, cumin and red pepper to taste (I like my food somewhat spicy). Cook the noodles from your mac and cheese package, drain. Mix the cheese sauce according to instructions directly into the beef (usually 1/4c milk and 4T butter or margarine plus mix). Add noodles. Stir.

    OMNOMNOMNOMNOMNOM
  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    Wow, Ardi, that sounds delicious. I'm guessing that if you don't have the box version of mac and cheese, you could just make some from the ground up, and add the spicy sauce and meat later. Will try when I get to a kitchen I rule over.
  • ardichokeardichoke Buttes Master B Lansing, MI Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    Yeah, there's no reason you couldn't do that. I did it from a box because I had box stuff and was throwing together a quick dinner from the small selection of items I had available.
  • CharshieCharshie Hollywood, California Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    BobbyDigi said:
    Request: How to Draw MLP

    -Digi
    Lulz. I wonder if my iPhone would be sufficient to vid record anything. Could be amusing.
  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    Charshie said:
    Lulz. I wonder if my iPhone would be sufficient to vid record anything. Could be amusing.
    All my rope videos were created with my HTC HD2.
  • primesuspectprimesuspect HumanGarbageDisposal Detroit, MI Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    I've moved drink recipes into the Icrontic Mixology thread

    http://icrontic.com/forum/showthread.php?t=84413
  • JokkeJokke Nuvsvaag, Norway Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    Oh, we have one of those too. Great!
  • colacola the dick man himself Right behind you Icrontian
    edited May 2011
    I'm sure I can dig out my Lifeguarding manual and provide some helpful tips when I move all my stuff back home :D
  • WagsFTWWagsFTW Grand Rapids, MI Icrontian
    Bump. Any new skills, anyone?
    Teramona
  • MomOfRoseMomOfRose Member
    edited Dec 2012
    I don't know if this falls under the "skill" category, but I've learned from experience. With the number of mini Icrontians increasing, the likelihood of a pregnant Icrontian (or pregnant partner of an Icrontian) visiting southern California is also increasing.

    One of the complaints I hear a lot from women who are pregnant while visiting southern California is "I can't go on any rides at Disneyland!"

    On the contrary, much fun can be had at The Happiest Place On Earth.

    Below are a list of preggo-approved moving attractions at Disneyland and Disney California Adventure. There are many other things to do that only require your moving feet or sitting seat. If you're planning a trip with your family while pregnant, these are the attractions you can ride worry-free.

    Disneyland:

    Jungle Cruise, Pirates of the Caribbean, The Haunted Mansion, The Many Adventures of Winnie The Pooh, Sailing Ship Columbia, Mark Twain Riverboat, Casey Jr. Circus Train, Dumbo the Flying Elephant*, Pinocchio's Daring Journey, Snow White's Scary Adventures, Peter Pan's Flight, Mr. Toad's Wild Ride, King Arthur's Carousel, Storybook Land Canal Boats, Alice in Wonderland, it's a small world, Roger Rabbit's Car Toon Spin, Autopia, Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage*, Buzz Lightyear Astro Blasters, Astro Orbiter*.

    California Adventure:

    Monster's Inc. Mike and Sully to the Rescue, Luigi's Flying Tires, Heimlich's Chew Chew Train, King Triton's Carousel, Toy Story Mania*, Mickey's Fun Wheel, Golden Zephyr*, Ariel's Undersea Adventure, Soarin' Over California*

    *These may affect people with a fear of heights, enclosed spaces or delicate inner ear balance (motion sickness)
  • WagsFTWWagsFTW Grand Rapids, MI Icrontian
    @MomOfRose Thanks for the tips!

    I have found out this week that I can put band-aids on my mid/upper back by myself. That's tough!

    MomOfRose
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