Learning to drive..

24

Comments

  • ShortyShorty Manchester, UK
    edited February 2006
    Started at 7.30am this morning. Just got home (3.15pm). Long day driving..!

    My instructor was very positive though, said I did great for my first time driving in years.. and that I was getting better all the time :)

    I feel confident but I have a long way to go yet! :)
  • pseudonympseudonym Michigan
    edited February 2006
    Shorty wrote:
    First day of intensive driving course today. 6 hours driving.. here we go :)

    Practical test on Friday... lets see how we do shall we :D

    Dear god. I think I had less time on the track getting my RACING license. You Brits are crazy!
  • botheredbothered Manchester UK
    edited February 2006
    Yeah but anybody could get a racing license. I believe if you get your shoes on the right feet you've passed. Passing the UK driving test is a bit more complicated.
  • ShortyShorty Manchester, UK
    edited February 2006
    pseudonym wrote:
    Dear god. I think I had less time on the track getting my RACING license. You Brits are crazy!
    That's the FIRST day = 6 hours.

    Then 6 hours each day up to and including Friday (the day of the test) plus an additional 15 hours starter lessons.

    Please DON'T be a n00b and try to talk about things you don't know anything about WITHOUT reading the rest of the thread or posts. Thanks :crazy:

    Damn racers! :aol:
  • edited February 2006
    [rant]Maybe we need to toughen up the driving tests here in the US like you all have in the UK. My wife came home this afternoon and said she saw a scratch on the right rear fender of the truck and wanted me to see it. So I go out and sure enough, there is a straight scratch about 12 inches long on the upper area of the fender, too high for a car or even a truck to do. So I look at it and it looks like someone had keyed the damn fender. That really pissed me off and we walked around to the back of the truck and I'm cussing up a storm and then I look at the back of the truck and I see why the truck got keyed (I'm not positive, but I'm 95% sure this is what happened). I'm looking at the back of the truck and I notice that there is a dent in the left corner of the bumper and then I notice that the bumper is also bent down a bit. So I go look closer and the left side of the bumper is pushed in and bent down and the left corner of the bumper was pushed in far enough to damage the metal behind it pretty badly. Since my wife had gone to pick up my daughter's flute from this music shop (which has a very cramped parking lot and I've told her before not to go there due to the ****ty parking lot but she wouldn't listen to me :rolleyes2 ), someone evidently backed into the truck and caved in the bumper, then most probably got out to look at the damage, then keyed the fender to add insult to injury.:rant: And it's because Louisiana has such a ****ty testing procedure to getting your driver's license that to qualify for driving here, basically you just have to be breathing when you go take the test. The tests, both written and practical, are a complete joke.:mean: So you have these inbred ****ing coonass retards driving all over the place and they actually don't even qualify to drive one of those cars at the amusement parks that have the guide rails, much less a real vehicle.

    So now I'm going to have to claim this on my collision insurance which will also jack my ****ing rates up for the next 3 years or so, all because some twinkle-toed c**ks*cker doesn't know how to back up properly and then hit and ran on my wife's truck.:rarr: [/rant]

    Sorry to hijack your thread, Shorty, but I just had to let it out. I'm really, really pissed right now about this.:rant:
  • edited February 2006
    Jeez, mudd, that sucks. It's really a shame that there are people out there with such a low character that instead of 'fessing up and putting a note on the windshield, they've got the gall to key the truck afterward!

    I agree with you 100% though - they really should tighten up the tests here.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited February 2006
    Dear god. I think I had less time on the track getting my RACING license. You Brits are crazy!
    Having lived in Europe for nine years (and driven extensively in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, France, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands), I completely understand why licensing is more restrictive over there. It's a completely different dynamic. Believe me, most Americans with American driving practices would not last long in Europe. European roads, for the most part were built on centuries old trails or wagon roads. More often than not, these roadways are very curvy, narrow, congested, sometimes cobblestone-slick, and demand driving skills that most Americans do not possess. The superhighways (in general) are also more demanding than here. Take your average US SUV and car with soft suspension, spongy road feel, sloppy steering, and automatic transmission - recipe for disaster on high-speed roads. No, 85mph is NOT high speed. I'm talking triple-digit mph. Add to all this the population density of most of Western Europe. That population density corrolates to higher traffic density. This does not mean that North America is better than Europe, or vice versa, it's only to point out completely different road and traffic dynamics.
  • airbornflghtairbornflght Houston, TX
    edited February 2006
    dont know bout yall, but our driving test are sorta tough. its points out of 100, and the damn cop took 20 points off because i didnt signal before leaving parralel parking. i was like, are you serious? and he took 5 off because i looked over the wrong shoulder when changing lanes. i asked him if it mattered as I was more comfortable with my left, he was an ******* anyway. another reason i dont care for johny law. anyway, i passed with a 75. you have to get a 70. I dont know how some of the kids (and adults) pass around here unless i just got a hardass for a hi-po examiner.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited February 2006
    It's not a uniform testing standard here in the States. And it should not be uniform. Driving in Nowhere, Kansas is much different than Deadhorse, Alaska, is much different than la la Los Angeles, and completely different than Boston, MASS. For the most part though, licensing testing, both written and driving, is very easy here compared to Europe. As I stated in my post above, the skills needed to drive and live to tell about it are much higher on the other side of the Atlantic.
  • edited February 2006
    hmmm..not to get off topic but i really dont think the test in Pennsylvania are hard at all. in fact i think they are a big joke. the written exam you need to get 15 out of 20 questions right. the driving you just parrallel park and drive in a loop. 3 right turns and your done. i did it in a F-150 extened cab with an 8 foot bed. the girl before we was having trouble getting her little car in the parrallel parking spot. i got in perfectly and effortlessly.

    Good Luck to you Shorty!
  • airbornflghtairbornflght Houston, TX
    edited February 2006
    yeh, i can see the difference, although. not ALL cars have grandma suspension though. Ive done a little work to mine. my mom hates it cause its so tight.

    shorty, what make/model of car are you gonna get?
  • ShortyShorty Manchester, UK
    edited February 2006
    Leonardo wrote:
    Having lived in Europe for nine years (and driven extensively in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, France, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands), I completely understand why licensing is more restrictive over there. It's a completely different dynamic. Believe me, most Americans with American driving practices would not last long in Europe. European roads, for the most part were built on centuries old trails or wagon roads. More often than not, these roadways are very curvy, narrow, congested, sometimes cobblestone-slick, and demand driving skills that most Americans do not possess. The superhighways (in general) are also more demanding than here. Take your average US SUV and car with soft suspension, spongy road feel, sloppy steering, and automatic transmission - recipe for disaster on high-speed roads. No, 85mph is NOT high speed. I'm talking triple-digit mph. Add to all this the population density of most of Western Europe. That population density corrolates to higher traffic density. This does not mean that North America is better than Europe, or vice versa, it's only to point out completely different road and traffic dynamics.
    A+ Post. Really, that's hit the nail right on the head there :)
  • edited February 2006
    I think I'll leave my car at home when I visit Europe, thanks. ;)
  • botheredbothered Manchester UK
    edited February 2006
    the damn cop took 20 points off because i didnt signal before leaving parralel parking. i was like, are you serious? and he took 5 off because i looked over the wrong shoulder when changing lanes.

    Then here you would have failed. Our diving test is an hours driving with the examiner sitting beside you with a clipboard. You do EVERY maneuver including reversing around corners, hill starts, emergency stops,everthing, and they demand you are in full control and safe 100% of the time. When reversing your wheels must not be more than 12 inches from the curb. The examiner mark his clipboard in two columns, One is for mistakes, the other for dangerous or potentially dangerous mistakes. You are allowed to make as many mistakes as you like but just one dangerous or potentially dangerous mistake and its an automatic failure. Not indicating would be considered potentially dangerous. It is a tough test
  • vertmanvertman Manchester, UK.
    edited February 2006
    Good luck with the practical test shorty, i have no doubt that you will pass.
  • edited February 2006
    bothered wrote:
    Then here you would have failed. Our diving test is an hours driving with the examiner sitting beside you with a clipboard. You do EVERY maneuver including reversing around corners, hill starts, emergency stops,everthing, and they demand you are in full control and safe 100% of the time. When reversing your wheels must not be more than 12 inches from the curb. The examiner mark his clipboard in two columns, One is for mistakes, the other for dangerous or potentially dangerous mistakes. You are allowed to make as many mistakes as you like but just one dangerous or potentially dangerous mistake and its an automatic failure. Not indicating would be considered potentially dangerous. It is a tough test

    I think if you make a potentially dangerous mistake on the driving test in the US, then you should fail. They don't fail enough people around here. Leo mentioned different standards for different states, and while that does hold true, I don't think it necessarily should. Americans don't always stay in the place in which they got their first license, and most places don't require you to recertify on the road to get a license there. I think they should raise the standards of every US driving test to be as tight as the tightest requirements are. Even if you don't need as much defensive driving skill in Nowhere, MT as you do in NYC, plenty of people from Nowhere go and visit NYC.

    Even the tightest US standards are WAY too lax. My wife's sister failed her test 2 times, finally (barely) passed on the 3rd out of the instructor's mercy - if you fail 3 times around here, you're required to go back to the driving school, which costs several hundred dollars. She should have failed the 3rd time, but he passed her to save her a few hundred bucks. That's a sad shame - she's been in at least 4 car accidents since then and destroyed 3 vehicles utterly - two of them she both wrecked and siezed the engines due to improper maintenance. She is 19 and has been driving for only 3 years - she's accomplished all of this mayhem in that short a time.

    I think the US tests should be stricter. I think you should be required to have 20+ hours of actual instructor-led road time plus a theory course on laws and basic maintenance, then you should take the written test on laws & maintenance techniques requiring at least a 90% to pass to the next stage, then take a driving test requiring ZERO dangerous mistakes to be made and you should have to pass a test of basic maintenance, showing that you are competent to check oil levels, change tires, change wiper blades, fill washer fluid, etc.

    My parents received a frantic phone call from my sister yesterday because she was out of washer fluid. She did not even know how to open the hood of the car.
  • botheredbothered Manchester UK
    edited February 2006
    Quite right. My driving instructor told me the Ministry of Transport is not interested in whether you are a good driver but absolutely insists you are a safe one, hence one potentialy dangerous error and you fail. The UK has (I think) the safest roads in the world.
  • airbornflghtairbornflght Houston, TX
    edited February 2006
    standards? what standards? thats the problem, we have no standards.

    is it seriously an hour of driving. mine was only about 20 minutes.
  • edited February 2006
    I'm with you 100%, GH, on the more stringent testing. A lot of these asshats around here wouldn't have a license if the tests were stricter.:cool2:

    Another thing I also believe in is for stricter testing for older drivers past the age of 55 or 60. I've seen way too many old folks driving that really have no business behind the wheel of a car, much less the 4000-6000 pound killer machines a lot of them are in. I'm not saying that all older drivers are bad, but there are quite a few of them that are frankly a menace on the highway. And these older drivers don't have to do anything but reapply for a license renewal as it stands now, with no additional testing required. :shakehead
  • QCHQCH Ancient Guru Chicago Area - USA
    edited February 2006
    Few observations.... The UK is fairly small and the public transportation system is well funded and organized. I agree that our driving tests are a joke and I know many people that should not be allowed in the passenger seat, let alone in the drivers seat!!! But, there are very few options to those that are not in major cities.

    Driving is becoming more and more a necessity. I travel 50 miles every day and that is nothing when compared to many. The typical US worker is expected to be at work for more than 40 hours a week. Add on travel times and the average worker can be away from home 10 hours a day. Add on the time to get ready in the mornings, cooking dinner, and preparing for bed, that leaves very little for relaxing.

    The US needs to fund mass transit, change the labor laws, and maybe they can afford to be more critical of drivers.
  • edited February 2006
    standards? what standards? thats the problem, we have no standards.

    is it seriously an hour of driving. mine was only about 20 minutes.

    ha. mine was less than 5 min. made 3 right turns, parrallel praked and wasx done. the instructor was reading as newspaper too.
  • airbornflghtairbornflght Houston, TX
    edited February 2006
    or you ****ting me...thats not a driving test. my 12 year old bros could do that minus the parrallel parking, but im sure he could do even that if he practiced. although, i dont find driving to be hard.

    pay attention to what you are doing.
    dont hit anybody (dont go to fast or slow)
    and dont be a jackass. its pretty simple.

    it aint rocket science.
  • botheredbothered Manchester UK
    edited February 2006
    QCH2002 wrote:
    Few observations.... The UK is fairly small and the public transportation system is well funded and organized.
    I have used trains and they're not too bad if you get the right deal. Last time I took my Daughter to London it cost around £30 (I think), a first class ticket for the same trip was £170, it is cheaper to fly there. There are loads of buses clogging up the roads. If I were to get a bus to Stockport (8 miles away) it costs £3.50 ($7?) and takes 30 mins to an hour. I can do it in the car for less than £1 and in 15 mins down the motorway. If you travel everyday you need a car here unless you're rich and arn't in a hurry.
  • Red-DawnRed-Dawn Been kidnapped and being held hostage in Edinburgh
    edited February 2006
    My bus pass in edinburgh costs £26 (~$52) a month and thats a student rate which i supose isnt bad. I travel 6 miles to uni everyday and it takes 40min in the morning when the roads arn't too busy and nearly an hr an a quarter in the evening with mild traffic.

    If i could drive and had a car it would take me less than 15min to drive to uni but then i'd have to find a parking space
  • ShortyShorty Manchester, UK
    edited February 2006
    Test day...

    3 more hours driving, half hour break then those all important 25 minutes :(

    Im ok so far but Im concerned about my nerves. I didn't have a great nights sleep but Im awake ;D

    Time for a shower, a shave & dress smart.. wish me luck guys.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited February 2006
    Don't try competing with the black Taxis!

    Good luck!
  • botheredbothered Manchester UK
    edited February 2006
    Go Shorty, you'll fly throught mate. Due to freak weather over Manchester you won't have the sun in your eyes either.
    Best of luck:thumbsup:
  • edited February 2006
    good luck shorty i will watch out for you today on the roads. Where abouts you doing your test?
  • dragonV8dragonV8 not here much
    edited February 2006
    All the best Shorty.:thumbsup:
  • edited February 2006
    Good luck, Shorty. I know that you will do well; anything you really put your mind to you can accomplish, man. :thumbsup:
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