My New Car Images

Sledgehammer70Sledgehammer70 California
edited June 2006 in The Pub
Sorry it took awhile to get these up... but here is my new baby....

Comments

  • GuyuteGuyute Gamehenge
    edited June 2006
    Nice- looks good in black! I haven't heard much about it (my fault- don't follow cars like I used to)-Did you fall in love right away or did it take a while?
  • airbornflghtairbornflght Houston, TX
    edited June 2006
    Damn, I nice car with a house to go with it! Looks good man.
  • MountainDewMountainDew Kentwood, MI
    edited June 2006
    :rockon: strait butter
  • GargGarg Purveyor of Lincoln Nightmares
    edited June 2006
    Nice car!

    (nudge) Someone ought to bump this thread (nudge)

    :D
  • botheredbothered Manchester UK
    edited June 2006
    How long are the streets in the US? I mean, a house number with five digits is just showing off. I'd hate to be a postman over there.
  • Sledgehammer70Sledgehammer70 California
    edited June 2006
    I have only seen a few addresses with less than 5 numbers. it is pretty dang common out here in California. TBH I have never had an address with a less amount of numbers.
  • WingaWinga South Africa
    edited June 2006
    Very cool cool car sledge!!!

    Like bothered, I am more interested in the houses in the US. I can't get over how everybody lives right next door to each other with no high walls or fences to seperate the yards in the front. Everything looks so uniform. And trees? Wheres the trees?
  • edited June 2006
    Gargoyle wrote:
    Nice car!

    (nudge) Someone ought to bump this thread (nudge)

    :D

    Thanks for the thread pimpage, Garg. Yup Sledge, as Garg mentioned, we have a thread for this. ;)
  • EnverexEnverex Worcester, UK
    edited June 2006
    Erm, what is it?
  • edited June 2006
    2007 Dodge Caliber SXT.
  • Sledgehammer70Sledgehammer70 California
    edited June 2006
    Winga wrote:
    Very cool cool car sledge!!!

    Like bothered, I am more interested in the houses in the US. I can't get over how everybody lives right next door to each other with no high walls or fences to seperate the yards in the front. Everything looks so uniform. And trees? Wheres the trees?

    Well we have a fence between out homes 6' tall the back yard runs about 72' deep and 84' wide... in better terms that is huge for sunny California track homes. My wife and I bought the house last September "when I just join SM" But other than that we rent a few rooms out to help pay the mortgage :) We do have a few trees in the font but you can't see them, and as the housing track is new, no trees have really had a chance to grow to make there presence...

    Prime you can see the back end of the wifes Passat :) "I love that car to"
  • GargGarg Purveyor of Lincoln Nightmares
    edited June 2006
    Hey Sledge, how's the visibility out the rear window of the Caliber? I saw one in person today and I was wondering.
    Winga wrote:
    Like bothered, I am more interested in the houses in the US. I can't get over how everybody lives right next door to each other with no high walls or fences to seperate the yards in the front. Everything looks so uniform. And trees? Wheres the trees?

    That kind of style is becoming pretty common for new construction, but neighborhoods can look pretty differenent depending on where you are in the country. In Oklahoma, we had bigger lots and more trees (despite trees not being all that common in the western part of the state before white settlers arrived). In New Mexico, grass is uncommon on residential lots, and in Santa Fe and Taos you'll often see traditional fencing made from tree branches, or stucco topped with glass shards. :eek:
  • airbornflghtairbornflght Houston, TX
    edited June 2006
    yeh, my lot is pretty big, the backyard is probably 80' long and some where around 45 feet wide, the frontyard is about that wide and 50' long. and I love trees, we have a big red maple in our frontyard that is as old as the house (20 some years) my dad planted it when he bought the house, and its nice now. The only downside is that my house is only about 1100 sq feet. quite small.:sad2:
  • Sledgehammer70Sledgehammer70 California
    edited June 2006
    Gargoyle wrote:
    Hey Sledge, how's the visibility out the rear window of the Caliber? I saw one in person today and I was wondering.

    It isn't like the Passat or my old S-10 as it is a bit narrow, but I got use to it real quick... so it isn't a bother... It was a concern at first. Also the right and left mirrors are electric so i can adjust to fit my needs without much of a fuss :)

    The one thing that bugged me was that the front end is not visible from the drive seat. I can't see my hood :) but i haven't hit anything yet, so I guess I am use to it also.
  • jradminjradmin North Kackalaki
    edited June 2006
    Were still on 4 numbers here in NC, but it's only been about 10 years since we actually HAD house numbers. Before then we had Rural Routes with Bix numbers. Rt 2 Box 482 was my previous address before the change =)

    Anyhow, thats a kickass truck. I want the new Challanger out NOW!
  • primesuspectprimesuspect Beepin n' Boopin Detroit, MI
    edited June 2006
    Winga wrote:
    Very cool cool car sledge!!!

    Like bothered, I am more interested in the houses in the US. I can't get over how everybody lives right next door to each other with no high walls or fences to seperate the yards in the front. Everything looks so uniform. And trees? Wheres the trees?

    This is a newer trend in the US - they call them "subdivisions" and it's usually a gated community with cookie-cutter look-alike homes that are relatively shoddily constructed. They are extremely overpriced, and they raze entire wooded areas, fields, or wildlife areas to build these generic lots. It's urban sprawl, and it's shameful.

    Most older homes are not like this, and yes, there are trees.

    PS: This is nothing against you, Sledge. I don't mean to sound like I'm bashing your house. :( They're building the same kinds of homes around me, and they damage the real estate market near them because of their over-inflated value.
  • Sledgehammer70Sledgehammer70 California
    edited June 2006
    The value of our homes are listed pretty competitively, the builder was Lennar which is one of the best for quality. These guys did take extra steps in making these homes better. The housing track consists of 212 homes and is not gated. Our house was appraised at $400,000 range and is at the low end of the market out here. The 2 stories sell for about $680's to $720's and homes in Temecula range from $400's to 2.2 Million... in all California real estate sucks.

    Maybe in Michigan they build homes like these cheaply but California's tend not to buy the cheap crap....

    They are kind of cookie cutter homes, but there is 17 different models.. so it isn't to much of the same across the board... your lucky to see 2 of the same houses on 1 street & at that they have different styles... Mediterranean, Spanish etc...
  • edited June 2006
    I think Brian was railing more against the building practices which are destroying the face of our planet, rather than necessarily the quality of the McMansions that are being built with these methods.

    Winga, unfortunately, most of these neighborhoods have a "Homeowners Association", which is basically a group of your neighbors who get together and make rules about what you are not allowed to do on your land. Very often, one of the things you're not allowed to do on your own land is put tall fences around your yard. This is probably because in the new subdivisions, tall fences make the yards look as small as they really are.
  • Sledgehammer70Sledgehammer70 California
    edited June 2006
    Some images while it was being built....
  • Sledgehammer70Sledgehammer70 California
    edited June 2006
    A few more...:)
  • NightwolfNightwolf Afghanistan
    edited June 2006
    Maybe in Michigan they build homes like these cheaply but California's tend not to buy the cheap crap....
    Look like a lot of the $300k - $3 mil houses that I stucco out in Lawrence, KS. Rarely do I ever see chimneys though. They're all of cheap quality, they're just large and look nice. I don't know what your background is in construction, but if you want to see houses that are actually built well you're gonna have to go look at contractors own homes.
  • Sledgehammer70Sledgehammer70 California
    edited June 2006
    I have an Architectural degree in Commercial & Residential Design, My side company M.E. Consulting does Commercial & Residential Blue Prints for those Contractors you speak of. I use to work in construction for a few years doing electrical and framing along with Foundation slabs. So I guess I know a bit about construction.

    Most contractors’ homes are never finished as they don't have time to complete them. Well from the dozen or so I have seen. Quality of a build comes into place really on how the house is attached to its slab, how well insulated the house is 7 of course the M,P, & E. A frame is a frame and wood is wood DF #2 will always be DF #2 . But the difference in the actually quality is all in the M,P & E... Mechanical, Plumbing, & Electrical.

    Here is a plan I am working on now
  • botheredbothered Manchester UK
    edited June 2006
    Is that for next years LAN?
  • airbornflghtairbornflght Houston, TX
    edited June 2006
    bothered wrote:
    Is that for next years LAN?


    Hells Yeh!
  • Sledgehammer70Sledgehammer70 California
    edited June 2006
    That is actually a set of plans for the LAN Center I will be manager for in late 2007 :) 200+ PC gaming stations with 50+ Xbox 360 setups attached to 50" big screen TV's with nice surround sound chairs :)
  • WingaWinga South Africa
    edited June 2006
    This thread has seriously morphed from car images into house images.
    Sorry for jacking the thread Sledge but I find housing set-ups in the US fascinating.

    Crime in SA is very high and everybody in affluent areas hides behind huge walls, owns a dozen half rabid dogs and installs state of the art security systems to try and keep the bad guys out.
    Most people never talk to their neighbours. In fact most times, they don't know who their neighbours are.

    We have a similar concept to what prime described in what we call security complexes. They buy up a tract of land; build a massive wall right round it. Put guard gates and booms at the entrances and then squash as many houses as they legally allowed to onto the land and sell them for ridiculous prices. Those homes obviously do not have walls and fences between them as the security lies in the entire complex being closed off and patrolled by guards. It sells on the fact that you can lock up and go on holiday for e.g. without worrying about someone looking after your pets and whether you going to come back to an empty house.

    Generally though, property in South Africa is very cheap, so the plots are huge. We hardly ever build double storey unless we after a particular view. We have so much space to build on. Also wooden structures are very rare and are considered a luxury here. Everything is bricks and mortar.
    The roof which is wooden trusses make up a third of the cost of the house.

    I just love your suburban neighbourhoods. They look......well homely I guess.
  • Sledgehammer70Sledgehammer70 California
    edited June 2006
    TBH I know most of my neighbours and we get together from time to time to have a drink or 2... most often 4 or 5. Its a fun place out here where everyone is friendly... One day you should come and visit I always leave my door open to friends...
Sign In or Register to comment.