Unbelievable Pictures Of New York City

profdlpprofdlp The Holy City Of Westlake, Ohio
edited February 2007 in The Pub
I happened on this site by accident. If you like architecture and history even half as much as I do it will be worth your time. :)

Comments

  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited February 2007
    Thanks. I enjoyed that.
  • KwitkoKwitko Sheriff of Banning (Retired) By the thing near the stuff
    edited February 2007
    Very nice pics. It's a shame how cities change, how they become cookie-cutter, homogenized. They lose their personality. If you were to ask architectural fans what one of the greatest travesties of architecture is, they'll tell you it was the demolition of the original Penn Station, one of the finest examples of Beaux-Arts ever built. Grand Central Station pales in comparison to the original Penn.

    Remnants are tucked away behind newly built walls. When I would take the 1 train to Penn Station, the south exit passes a walled-off area when you can catch glimpses of the original brass banisters and archways. It must have been something to walk through there, waiting for the trains, looking up at the enormous steel and glass ceiling.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited February 2007
    Seth, living in the city, you might know the difference. The rest of us ...it's just awesome. From both times I've been there I am convinced New York City has a very pronounced character and personality. It's NOT cookie-cutter or homogenized.
  • KwitkoKwitko Sheriff of Banning (Retired) By the thing near the stuff
    edited February 2007
    Leo, there are definitely still buildings in NYC with personality. We have probably one of the most recognizable buildings in the world, the Empire State Building. Take a look at www.forgotten-ny.com. You'll be amazed at what's been torn down to make way for high-capacity buildings- especially apartment buildings- that are just drab, ugly boxes.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited February 2007
    Yeah, I can understand your sentiment. People like me though, who've only seen the city in the last 25 years, probably wouldn't notice the difference.
  • BlueDragonBlueDragon Longwood, FL USA
    edited February 2007
    I am studying autocad in college and i love Architectural history that was amazing thank you for sharing
  • MountainDewMountainDew Kentwood, MI
    edited February 2007
    its amazing how much changed in only 100 years, makes you wonder what the next 100 years will bring.
  • KwitkoKwitko Sheriff of Banning (Retired) By the thing near the stuff
    edited February 2007
    Leonardo wrote:
    Yeah, I can understand your sentiment. People like me though, who've only seen the city in the last 25 years, probably wouldn't notice the difference.

    It's happening more in the outer boroughs of New York, like Queens and Brooklyn, but it still happens in Manhattan. I suppose cities always change, but not always for the better, at least from an aesthetic view.
  • GargGarg Purveyor of Lincoln Nightmares
    edited February 2007
    I've never been to New York, and I certainly didn't expect to get sucked into a series of photos about New York for 30 minutes.

    But I did :). Amazing architecture. Sad to know that some of it is gone, and I couldn't see it even if I got on a plane. Thanks for posting that, Prof :thumbsup:
  • MrBillMrBill Missouri
    edited February 2007
    Gargoyle wrote:
    I've never been to New York, and I certainly didn't expect to get sucked into a series of photos about New York for 30 minutes.

    But I did :). Amazing architecture. Sad to know that some of it is gone, and I couldn't see it even if I got on a plane. Thanks for posting that, Prof :thumbsup:
    Ditto!

    I have flown into LaGuardia and drove up to West Point and back to LaGuardia, but we didn't see NYC.
  • csimoncsimon Acadiana
    edited February 2007
    BlueDragon wrote:
    I am studying autocad in college and i love Architectural history that was amazing thank you for sharing
    Hey Blue we have something in common here.
    Nice find prof!
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