C Programming resources.

ThelemechThelemech Victoria
edited November 2007 in Science & Tech
I have just started teaching myself C and currently reading/studying C Primer Plus 3rd Edition (The Waite Group) along with Teach Yourself C Programming in 21 Days. Also downloaded Borland C/C++ Compiler. I was wondering if any one could recommend any other books, websites, any other resources and maybe some good open source compilers. :cheers:

Comments

  • kryystkryyst Ontario, Canada
    edited October 2007
    C programming for dummies, I'm not kidding, it's a fantastic book. The 'for dummies' books are some of the best resources around.
  • ThelemechThelemech Victoria
    edited October 2007
    Thanks kryyst... I'll give that book a try, though I must admit I have usually avoided that series. Probably based off the series title .. a psychological thing I guess :bigggrin:
  • JBJB Carlsbad, CA
    edited October 2007
    Why not C++?
  • ThelemechThelemech Victoria
    edited October 2007
    What are the benefits of C++ over C. It has more to do with the fact that I was able to buy the above mentioned C programming books for 20$ for both.
    ADA, Perl, Python, C and C++ are the languages I have been looking into so far. What are the future friendly languages?
  • mmonninmmonnin Centreville, VA
    edited October 2007
    cplusplus.com and of course the msdn library online.

    C++/C# and Java are the 'in' languages I believe.
  • JBJB Carlsbad, CA
    edited October 2007
    C++ is object oriented, where C is not. C++ has classes and the wonderful standard template library (STL).
  • ThelemechThelemech Victoria
    edited October 2007
    Although I will read/study the books anyway (I hope I am not wasting my time:cool:) but I will definetly look more closely at C++ and C# ... actually been scanning the msdn library .. funny you should mention that mmonnin:bigggrin: and yep lots of mention of C#(especially) and C++


    Oh and thanks for the responses my friends :cheers:
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX
    edited November 2007
    C is, well, sort of old. It's not a dead language, but C++ has eclipsed it on the whole. Most C-family programmers now do that in ++, or #.
  • mmonninmmonnin Centreville, VA
    edited November 2007
    w00t go printf, haha. But yeah cout << and everything that comes with C++ is more worth your time.
  • hypermoodhypermood Smyrna, GA
    edited November 2007
    gcc is probably THE open source compiler, and you can get it by installing cygwin in Windows or by running Linux. Microsoft gives away Visual Studio Express editions which are great for learning because the same IDE will do C/C++/C#.

    Regarding benefits of one language over another, it really depends on what you are doing. If you want to work with hardware, device drivers, or native api's from hardware vendors you, will benefit most from C. If you want to write system code, daemons, or services you will likely use a C/C++ blend. If you are writing mostly user applications heavy in UI code it will be more pure C++ or C#.

    I've been writing code at the device driver and system level for almost 10 years and have done everything in C/C++; however, C# is great for getting UI stuff running quickly and writing test code. As Thrax, JB, and mmonnin said, there are plenty of reasons to use C++ and C#. Just pick the right language for what you to do. Personally, I think it is easier to go from C to C++ than the converse - just my opinion.

    Good luck!
  • mmonninmmonnin Centreville, VA
    edited November 2007
    Yeah I think its easier to learn from the bottom up and add functionality from C->C++->C# than it is to go backwards and try to learn what you cant do with older languages. I've always used VS.net because its always been available to me as a student. After you learn C++ I think Java becomes easier as well, at least it was taught to me that way. Plus no pointers in Java! :)

    Props to hypermood at writing code at the system driver level!!
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