Building a New PC

245

Comments

  • BuddyJBuddyJ Dept. of Propaganda OKC
    edited December 2008
    Hard drive failure is usually mechanical. Reformatting won't help. If the drive is making clicking noises, it's pretty much a goner.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited December 2008
    Mike, you still need to tell us details on your power supply. That is the most critical component of a computer. Please post brand and model. Lacking that, please photograph and post the label on the side of the PSU (power supply unit - learn this acronym).
  • The-Lovable-Mr--HaterThe-Lovable-Mr--Hater Planet Earth
    edited December 2008
    ok, here are the specs for the power supply.........

    Brand - Power Up (im sure not the best, but i paid $20 for it at comp usa)
    450 Watt ATX Power Supply
    20/24 Pin Motherboard Connector.....x1
    4 Pin +12V Motherboard Connector...x1
    4 Pin Molex Connectors...................x6
    4 Pin Floppy Power Connector..........x1
    PCI Express Connector....................x1
    SATA Connector............................x2
    120 mm Fan

    I hope that helps.


    As far as the hard drive, there has been no clicking noises. i was going to purchase a new one any way, but at least i dont have to worry about that yet. thanks.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited December 2008
    OK, fine, but what we need are the specifications from the PSU label, not the box label. On the label, it should show what the amperage is for each voltage level ("rail"). For instance, the +12v rail might 18 amps.
  • The-Lovable-Mr--HaterThe-Lovable-Mr--Hater Planet Earth
    edited December 2008
    ok, here is a pic of the box...........
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited December 2008
    If you run a Q6600 and a mid-range video card at full load simultaneously with your PSU, you might be in for problems. That PSU maker has been a bit shifty, or we'll just call them cheap. You'll notice that the 12v rail only has 288 Watts available, and that's only peak Watts - for very short periods. The 5v rail is loaded with 150 Watts. Unfortunately for you, the 5v line is used very little with modern motherboards, processors and video cards. Now, all of this assumes your "Power Up" PSU is decent quality. I don't know - never heard of that brand. I'd give it a slighty better than 50% chance of powering your new system sufficiently. How old is your PSU?

    EDIT: not at all sure of the better than 50% chance...I think I'll take that back. :)

    EDIT: My guess is that this PSU was only $20 because it's based on a very old design, modified only enough to allow "450" to be put on the label. A high +5v rating like that is almost always an indicator that the PSU is an antiquated design. If I were building a new computer, I would not put that PSU in it. If it were a modern design from a quality maker, a 450-rated PSU would be plenty of power for what you want to build.
  • fatcatfatcat Mizzou
    edited December 2008
    24 amp on the 12 rail is weak, very.
  • The-Lovable-Mr--HaterThe-Lovable-Mr--Hater Planet Earth
    edited December 2008
    ok, thanks for the info. and come to think of it, i might have only paid $10 for it.

    the really funny thing is......i work in the automotive aftermarket business (i.e. car stereos, alarms, etc.) and i tell the same thing to people about their amplifiers and car stereos. i just "assumed" that the PSU for a computer was, well, just what it said it was. now, i DO feel COMPLETELY STUPID! lol.

    now, is there a brand that i should look for or not look for? 450 watts is good enough for what i want? i guess lets start there and get this thing started.

    also, i guess the tower doesnt really matter, right? i mean, say i really like how cool one looks. as long as it has the spots available for the harddrives and disc drives, thats kinda all that matters, right? will i have problems fitting certain motherboards and other components into certain ones?

    thanks for the help guys. you all rock!
  • LincLinc Bard Detroit
    edited December 2008
    OCZ, Antec, and PC Power & Cooling are the 3 brands I'd put in my own system. I hear Thermaltake and Corsair are also reputable.

    The capacity of the power supply you need depends on the parts. I gather you're not looking to build a super gaming machine and based on Thrax's guide it looks like 450W will be a solid bet for a basic system.
  • KhaosKhaos New Hampshire
    edited December 2008
    You can add Silverstone to that short list of reputable PSU brands.

    Thermaltake is hit or miss. Their recent, high-end models are excellent quality. I believe they are built by Channel Well Tech or Seasonic. I have an older 430Watt Thermaltake that is of mediocre quality.

    If Mike needs a new PSU, he can't do better than that 400W Silverstone I posted about earlier for $30 on Newegg. It is a Seasonic-built unit that uses Japanese capacitors and provides a very solid 400 watts, which is sufficient for a quad core system with no high-end GPU assuming the power is distributed mainly to the +12V rails.
  • the_technocratthe_technocrat IC-MotY1 Indy
    edited December 2008
    In all honesty, I think the best solution for you is to take the time to understand exactly what you're doing before throwing away your (parents) money.

    Dells work fine, and I have a hard time making non-gaming computers for friends and family for less cost to them than a good dell.

    If you're interested in learning, then great, but having people build a computer for you one component at a time isn't teaching you anything.
  • GnomeWizarddGnomeWizardd Member 4 Life Akron, PA
    edited December 2008
    I would personally recommend OCZ power supplies and the Asus board, I have a E8400 and I do some video editing for my family videos it works great Granted the Q6600 ( quad core ) will do just fine if not a bit better


    I also would recommend a Nvidia 9600 Based video card, I have gone back and forth between the Nvidia and ATI brands and have always ended back up with Nvidia ( they just seem more stable for me
  • LincLinc Bard Detroit
    edited December 2008
    but having people build a computer for you one component at a time isn't teaching you anything.
    I completely disagree. Listening (reading) the discussion is an invaluable learning tool and gateway into enthusiast hardware. I built my first computer by two friends taking me to a local computer show and holding my hand, piece by piece, until I had all the components I needed to build my first system for college.

    Now I have an awesome gaming rig (my fourth or fifth primary rig) and own a tech website! ;D

    Most of our system builders on Icrontic started with a thread like this one.

    //edit: For the record, that was dodo and JB (formerly Radeon_Man), the same two who told me to check out Icrontic in '02.
  • The-Lovable-Mr--HaterThe-Lovable-Mr--Hater Planet Earth
    edited December 2008
    Well, first of all, to The Technocrat, it's My money. I'm not a child and I don't live with my parents. I have never built a computer before, and therefore, that is why I am in this forum. Also, I'm not as dumb as you might think. I don't know all the "lingo" or every type of components that are the best, but I do know electronics and am easy to teach. I understand that you are probably very smart when it comes down to this stuff. I am not. Don't get me wrong, you must assume because I am in here asking how to build my own system, I must be young. It's ok, your error.

    Next, thanks to everyone who is willing to help me. I will look into getting one of those power supplies. Next, what about the cases? Does it matter?
  • TBonZTBonZ Ottawa, ON
    edited December 2008
    Welcome to Icrontic Mike. Since you don't need the cutting edge in case air-flow design, sounds like your criteria for a box would mainly be to look good while providing adequate cooling for your current selection of hardware. I personally will recommend Antec as they meet all the above criteria at almost all price points.

    If you have haven't busted your budget yet, I would start with this model at $60 - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129042

    There are no front fans included with the case but if you really need them you have two spots to attach more.
  • The-Lovable-Mr--HaterThe-Lovable-Mr--Hater Planet Earth
    edited December 2008
    Thanks, TBonZ. Actually, thanks to everyone who has welcomed me. Honestly, I like the blue LED's in some of the nicer cases. I was thinkin of somthing like that, just wasn't sure if it really mattered or not. I know that they are a little bigger (most of them anyway), and I dont mind that. I just want a cool looking one with the power that I need. Thanks for the reply. Also, it actually makes me feel good that I have been going to Newegg to purchase things (in the past) and that all of you keep refering the same site. At least I know Im on the right track. Thanks again.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited December 2008
    Newegg is not necessarily the best, but they have an excellent selection and inventory, and their prices are usually quite good. We tend to use it as a point of reference.
  • The-Lovable-Mr--HaterThe-Lovable-Mr--Hater Planet Earth
    edited December 2008
    ok, here is one that i see on sale. how about these specs?


    17-341-012-06.jpg
    i hope these are better.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited December 2008
    Nice! Healthy power on the +12v rails and a reputable brand. I have two OCZ PSUs powering systems. That will handle your system very nicely unless you are planning on dual video cards.
  • The-Lovable-Mr--HaterThe-Lovable-Mr--Hater Planet Earth
    edited December 2008
    ok, cool. ill put that on the list. now, as far as a tower goes, does it matter the size, or style? as long as i have room for all the hardware and multiple fans, i should be good, right? i will be purchasing the power and tower first, so i can start with the mods after that. right decision?
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited December 2008
    The size is up to you. The most important factors are cost, quality of construction, and ventilation. Avoid computer cases that do not accommodate at least one each, front and back, 120mm fan.

    Large cases are better if you frequently access the hardware for upgrades, tweaking, or intend to use the case throughout the years for subsequent new builds.
  • edited December 2008
    You also need to make sure that the motherboard type is supported by the case. Some cases support ATX, some don't, some support many different types. Make sure and check the type that your motherboad is and make sure it will work in the case you get.
  • The-Lovable-Mr--HaterThe-Lovable-Mr--Hater Planet Earth
    edited December 2008
    ok, good to know. thnx for the help. im looking right now for something cool. are there cases that support ALL motherboards?
  • edited December 2008
    This case
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146047
    Supports the main types of ATX boards.
    Extended ATX, ATX, and Micro-ATX
    6 120mm fans
    2 front
    1 side
    1 rear
    and 2 top
    69.99 after 30 (MIR)
  • edited December 2008
    Here is another one you might like
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146030

    If your getting an ATX motherboard then all you need in the case for motherboard compatibility is ATX, there is a lot of ATX boards out there so you wouldnt have to worry about not having options for upgrading in the future.
  • The-Lovable-Mr--HaterThe-Lovable-Mr--Hater Planet Earth
    edited December 2008
    both of those are kinda cool. thanks for the input sniper. still looking, but its ice to have options. i appreciate all the help you guys have provided. I REALLY DO! some unfortunate circumstances have pushed back my time table for getting some of this stuff (My 52 inch tv decided to start having problems), so i have to prioritize and get my tv fixed first. but i am still reading this thread, and looking for any positive input.

    also, i would like to apologize for my, all beit rude, comment to the technocrat. i didnt mean for it to sound bad, but generally when someone makes a comment about me, when they dont know me, puts me on the defense. if he is still watching this post, then please accept my scincere apology.

    i look forward to any other comments on things i could use for what i am doing.
  • edited December 2008
    depending on what motherboard you get i found a nice set of Memory OCZ 4gb DDR3 1333 on Newegg for $41 after maill-in-rebate
  • KhaosKhaos New Hampshire
    edited December 2008
    Heya Mike -- Just checking in. Good to see that you're working through the details of your build. Feel free to shoot me a PM or post here if you have any questions.

    The OCZ memory for $41 is a fairly outstanding deal.

    One thing to be wary of is that a major processor of Mail-In Rebates recently filed bankruptcy. Now, I have always had my MIR's from Newegg purchases honored, but in this economic climate and with the recent bankruptcies, I wouldn't count on it when comparing prices. Just something to keep in the back of your mind as you make your purchasing decisions; if the difference is a few bucks with the MIR factored in, you might want to steer towards straight Instant Savings deals at this point in time. Especially when/if dealing outside of Newegg.

    For example, in contrast to Newegg, I have never had a MIR from CompUSA honored. Heh.
  • The-Lovable-Mr--HaterThe-Lovable-Mr--Hater Planet Earth
    edited December 2008
    thanks for keeping up to date, khaos. yea, ill do that (watch out for bankruptcies) cause right now is NOT THE TIME to be blowing money!

    ok, now i know this is going to sound kinda stupid, but since i dont know, i feel i need to ask.

    what is an ATX motherboard, by that i mean, what is the difference between motherboards? do they their usb's, ethernet cards, etc., in a different location than other boards? are teh screw holes somewhere different? i just dont understand the differences (since i havent really gone to a store and looked at them yet). just wondering.

    and, also, is there a better way to go as far as type (i.e. atx or other type)? cool, thanks for the info.

    once again, thanks for all the help.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited December 2008
    The primary difference between motherboards is fairly simple - size. Micro ATX is designed for small enclosures, ATX is designed for mid and full tower cases. As a general rule though, ATX boards have more expansion slots and quite often more up to date features. Go ATX unless you want SFF (small form factor, meaning really small).
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