Your take on Detroit

GnomeWizarddGnomeWizardd Member 4 LifeAkron, PA
I was wondering to get a take on Detroit from the people who actually live there, Which happens to be quite a few of my fellow IC'ers. By now everyone has hear of Detroit financial problems and the decay of the city itself. Now with the bankruptcy happening. I was wondering if the City is in as bad of shape Physically and what I am reading on several news sites. I know Harrisburg went into bankruptcy last year here in PA but the city inst in as bad of shape as what I am hearing in Detroit

Whats your take on the Motor City
«1

Comments

  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX
    edited July 2013
    Detroit, as with any city, has good parts and bad. The bad are bad, the good are good and getting better. Detroit is making social progress in leaps and bounds, but that almost always gets lost in the furor created by the unctuous circlejerking over Detroit's woes.

    I can bring anyone to Detroit and show them a marvelous time, and I only recently had fallen in love with the city before I moved to Toronto. It's a big disappointment that I didn't get to explore my new love for the city more before I left it. I delight in returning to ICHQ and experiencing Detroit, along with its social revival.

    Detroit is not the abandoned train station any more than the Auburn Gresham is Chicago. But everyone needs a city to dump on, a city that makes others smugly feel better about their own shortcomings--for America, that city is Detroit.

    The bankruptcy doesn't change anything except, perhaps, for the better. If Detroit can economically and politically begin to recover in the ways it has socially recovered these last 10 years, Detroit will rise as a metropolis again in our lifetimes. Count on it.
    UPSLynxWagsFTW
  • midgamidga "There's so much hot dog in Rome" ~digi (> ^.(> O_o)>
    I don't live there, but I find Detroit both terrifying and beautiful. I want to spend a whole lot more time there.
    UPSLynxWagsFTW
  • JokkeJokke Bergen, Norway
    I want to spend a whole lot more time there.
    Don't we all?
  • UPSLynxUPSLynx :KAPPA: Redwood City, CA
    It breaks my heart and pisses me off to see so many uninformed people trashing on Detroit on FB and Twitter in light of the recent news. No one truly understands Detroit until they see it for themselves.

    I love Detroit. It's my home away from home. I know I'll never 'get' Detroit like a local, but I will always hold that city in a special place in my heart. I deal with trash talkers all the time when I talk about going to Detroit on trips, and I'm always quick to explain just why that opinion is wrong, but even then, you have to see it, experience it, feel it.

    I hate seeing the troubles that plague Detroit financially, but the bankruptcy news is good news. It means change is happening, and progression and recover are on the way. There's so much soul to that city, and Detroiters are really rallying about making things better. That's exciting to see, and should set a precident for the communities of every other major metropolitan area.

    Detroit has more life in it than most any other city I've spent time in. A place like Los Angeles, as much as I love it, just seems hollow and dull compared to Detroit. It's that kind of vibe that makes me love Detroit. It's without question one of my favorite places in the United States.
    midgaGnomeQueen
  • colacola part legend, part devil... all man Balls deep
    I don't know much about finance or law, nor will I claim to. All I can say, is that I count the times I've been in the D with the best of em. Every place in that city seems to have a story too it, and the city gives off a vibe, it feels alive. I can't tell you how excited I get when I can find time to go there, it's a city that keeps you coming back for more again and again and again.
    UPSLynx
  • TeramonaTeramona Consulting Tea Specialist Best Coast!
    I bought a Detroit pin while I was there this last time, and I put it on my book bag. So far, I've had to school two confused coworkers as to my reasoning behind wanting it there.

    Well.

    Have you ever heard of the Heidelberg Project? Have you looked at the architecture of Detroit? There's a lot more to this place than what happened to the auto industry. There's art, and food, and real beauty. Not just physical beauty, but there's definitely a vibe and spirit about this place that you can't help but be proud of when you're there. The hate that the city gets is like any other kind of band wagon. Some people don't really know why they make fun of Detroit, they just know that it's easy and popular to do.

    I believe in Detroit. So, you know, the pins stays.
  • IlriyasIlriyas The Syrupy Canadian Toronto, Ontario
    EPIC this year really made me realize how incredibly amazing Detroit is, the architecture alone is incredible and as Prime was telling me back on the way to Canada tells a lot of stories. It's so completely polarizing being able to drive down a single street in Detroit and see historic milestones in architecture that tell, as much about the booms and declines of the city as the culture of the periods in which the buildings were constructed.

    I've also never met a group of people more passionate about their city than everyone that I talked to in Detroit and it definitely says a lot about the social dynamic that everyone I talked to is so involved and cares so much about the city's future both culturally and economically.

    It's the sort of thing you don't see in a metropolis like Toronto, New York, or Los Angeles that are in relatively good financial situations the average person won't care because there's no need to and it makes the whole place ultimately boring.

    Also, yeah Detroit is ultimately something you need to see for yourself to at least partially understand. My first trip to EPIC I was pensive because of everything the media craps out about it but having visited twice and gotten to experience it for what it is I absolutely can't wait for my next opportunity to visit.
  • NomadNomad A Small Piece of Hell
    I thought I would chime in as someone who left Metro Detroit.

    I live in New York now, I moved here almost three years ago. With the news of the bankruptcy, a lot of co-workers and friends have asked how I felt. I should qualify by saying I do not consider myself a Detroiter. I, like most other whites from the area, grew up in a suburb just north of the city.

    In high school and especially college, I spent a lot of time downtown: Shows at the Majestic, ice skating in Campus Martius, burgers at Miller's, the DIA, Red Wings games and even taught a semester of art to fourth and fifth graders at Butzel Elementary school near Indian Village.

    But, like a lot of people my age (now 25) I left after college. This is after extensive drilling by both the University of Michigan and Michigan State University which rightfully beg you not to leave the state when you graduate. There is a huge attrition of young talent that leaves the state in the first year after graduation, and by their third or fourth year some places cite a figure as high as 80% of graduates leave the city for. The reason is pretty simple: jobs.

    Some of the suburbs offer more work, but a great deal of it still revolves around the auto industry. I worked in a studio for three years as an intern, then about eight months after college as a full-time employee, but all we did was car ads. You try to go to places like Team Detroit or Armstrong White it's the same work, just a different car company. Work in video editing? You are probably going to be cutting local car ads.

    It's not that the work is all bad, I actually got to do some really cool work for Harley-Davidson, but if you want something else and are in a creative field like design or journalism, it's all based out of NYC, DC or SF.

    Detroit isn't an attractive place to live for a lot of people, but the scarcity of work, especially within the cities limits, is a real limiting factor. Combine that with poor schools, limited to no city services and you have a recipe for vacancy.

    Yet, I think bankruptcy is in a way a disease the cures -- a necessary part of the process to healing a city that has endured decades of mismanagement. The city has shown signs of progress; each time I come back I see a bit more hope, a few new bars and restaurants. Detroit has a lot to overcome a generation of racial stratification. From what I have seen, there is still a pretty wide cultural and economic gap I think it's yet to be decided if all the white college students moving to the Woodbridge area is progress or just gentrification by another name, but at least they are trying.
  • edited July 2013
    First time I went up to Icrontic HQ, the old one, I ended up lost in Warren.

    I ended up lost in Warren on 8 Mile. Yes, that part of 8 Mile. In a shiny car with out of state plates. And you know what? I survived. Nobody pointed a gun at me, nobody shot at me, and I got the impression they were more annoyed by my presence than anything else.

    Out here in Cleveland? Yeah. If you accidentally end up on the wrong part of St. Clair, you will be shot at. Period. Likely robbed. If you are the wrong skin color, you are a literal target. It's so bad there that police regularly stop lost motorists and lead them OUT of the area. Out of necessity - especially if you have a halfway decent car. If you get noticed, you are pretty much going to get robbed or shot. How come the press isn't busy jacking off to that, and the blocks of squatters living in filth, dilapidated and failing infrastructure, and so on, in the ACTUAL poorest city in America. (Look it up. It's Cleveland.)

    When I went up to new ICHQ for the first time, I got lost in the "bad" part of Detroit residential proper. I was surrounded by collapsing, burned out husks of abandoned homes and businesses. But it wasn't frightening. Disturbing, sure - but not actually scary. Very much "here's a ton of horrible, horrible blight. It occurred because there is absolutely nobody left here." What made it disturbing was that there really was nobody. I was completely and utterly alone on a four lane boulevard. No cars, no pedestrians, just nothing. It was haunting as hell, but when I got to ICHQ, yeah. Entirely different town.
    Around the corner there's a brick duplex. I noticed something on the walls, and kind of groaned, figuring it was graffiti and I was in gang territory. Nope - kids were drawing things with sidewalk chalk. Sure, there's abandoned houses - but they weren't falling down or burned out. No worse than my suburb out here - actually a damn sight better as they'd at least made an effort to secure them. And the rest of the houses, people live in. They take pride in their homes. Next time you're at ICHQ, look at the kitty-corner brick house. Specifically look up at the gray parts. I want that house.
    While people are busy jacking off to ruin porn, the real Detroit? The parts people still live and work in? Really is a beautiful place.
    UPSLynx
  • NiGHTSNiGHTS San Diego
    edited July 2013
    From an outsider:

    Given the prevalence of Chapter 9 filings in California in the past few years (3, for those keeping score), I don't see this as another 'OH LOOK AT DETROIT LOL' - it is what it is, ...a chapter 9 filing, the largest one of any city to date. It's big for that reason alone. Chapter 9 is different from chapter 11 - the transparency and court power are limited in comparison. An oversimplification: you've theoretically got a dude at the wheel that can do as he likes, with little recourse or explanation as to why and how. ...it's big!

    Maybe it's because I live in Mexico (practically), but I don't find Detroit to but the butt end of jokes any more than any other city - quite the opposite, actually. I'm not sure if this is a middle-east/east coast thing, or what. It's interesting to see everyone's (rabid, at times) reaction to mention of the city, though. It's a good sign.
    A place like Los Angeles, as much as I love it, just seems hollow and dull
    That's because LA is hollow. ;)

    Also lolnomad
    RyanFodder
  • LincLinc Bard Detroit
    I think it's yet to be decided if all the white college students moving to the Woodbridge area is progress or just gentrification by another name, but at least they are trying.
    FWIW, my observation is that those college students are renting while taking classes, not permanent residents / recent graduates. I have noticed young couples moving in, tho.

    I think actively worrying about gentrification in a city that is something like 60% below the poverty line, at 38% of its peak population, and where 47% of property taxes go unpaid is pretty damn silly.
  • NomadNomad A Small Piece of Hell
    I think it's yet to be decided if all the white college students moving to the Woodbridge area is progress or just gentrification by another name, but at least they are trying.
    FWIW, my observation is that those college students are renting while taking classes, not permanent residents / recent graduates. I have noticed young couples moving in, tho.

    I think actively worrying about gentrification in a city that is something like 60% below the poverty line, at 38% of its peak population, and where 47% of property taxes go unpaid is pretty damn silly.
    In deference to what you are saying, the white post-college population that has moved into the city proper is still very small -- a lot of the people I know doing it are at least closely tied to the community, working for Gleaners, Eastern Market or are teachers / part of TFA.
  • CantiCanti =/= smalltime http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9K18CGEeiI&feature=related
    Detroit may be bankrupt

    but it's still better off than East St. Louis probably ever was.
  • primesuspectprimesuspect Beepin n' Boopin Detroit, MI
    @Nomad I think you'd be blown away at how much Detroit has changed just in three years.
  • KoreishKoreish I'm a penguin, deal with it. KCMO
    Detroit may be bankrupt

    but it's still better off than East St. Louis probably ever was.
    Quoted for the truth.
  • BHHammyBHHammy Somewhere in Hell
    If I actually manage to make it up to Icrontic HQ with my wife next year, I would certainly be interested in any of you folks showing me about and proving the media wrong.

    I know little-to-nothing about the place except what I've heard, and I'd love to hear the story from the other side of the fence.
    UPSLynx
  • BandrikBandrik Elkhart, IN
    If I actually manage to make it up to Icrontic HQ with my wife next year, I would certainly be interested in any of you folks showing me about and proving the media wrong.

    I know little-to-nothing about the place except what I've heard, and I'd love to hear the story from the other side of the fence.
    @DJMeph gives a bike tour during IC Expo. He lives and breathes love for Detroit, so it may be the ultimate way to sightsee the city.
    midga
  • UPSLynxUPSLynx :KAPPA: Redwood City, CA
    While we're talking about it - Detroit in the 50s

    image
    midgaWagsFTW
  • primesuspectprimesuspect Beepin n' Boopin Detroit, MI
    That picture is taken about a mile from ICHQ. That's the Lodge (M-10), looking north. That train bridge is still there. That building on the right is the Nabisco building, now owned (and being renovated by) U-Haul. The Argnoaut Building where Shinola is located is just another block to the right from this picture.

    Cool find!
    UPSLynxJokkeGarg
  • Detroit: more halfassed articles than you can count about "OMG BANKRUPTCY CLEARLY IT'S THE LIBERALS FAULT" with implied and explicit overtones of racism and ignorance.

    East Cleveland: another serial killer and there's one article. What, you thought I was exaggerating? Gods, don't I wish I was.
  • UPSLynxUPSLynx :KAPPA: Redwood City, CA
    That picture is taken about a mile from ICHQ. That's the Lodge (M-10), looking north. That train bridge is still there. That building on the right is the Nabisco building, now owned (and being renovated by) U-Haul. The Argnoaut Building where Shinola is located is just another block to the right from this picture.

    Cool find!
    That's awesome, I thought I recognized that building on the right. I wish steam locomotives still were a thing, this is such an epic look.
  • QCHQCH Ancient Guru Chicago Area - USA
    There is that sign about Obama being at fault... it's near ICHQ. ;)
  • I laughed my ass off at this.

    "NO DOWNSIDE AT ALL! DRIVERLESS CARS AND MANDATORY GLASS FOR EVERYONE! They can just use all the poor people as cheap labor or buy them bus tickets out of town! All part of the Google Residence Policy! EVERYBODY WINS!"
  • GnomeWizarddGnomeWizardd Member 4 Life Akron, PA
    This is an awesome read of a thread! I expected a good response but this is awesome. My personal feelings is that Detroit falls and even the American problems are problems created by BOTH Corrupt Parties. Articles that state its the Libs fault or the GOPs fault are completely uttter crap. Both parties are Corrupt and the finger pointing about Detroit needs to stop. instead of talking about who made the issue how about talking about how to actually fix the problems
    midga
  • AlexDeGruvenAlexDeGruven Wut? Meechigan
    NPR has been doing a series this week on cities like Detroit and Cleveland, and they've been doing a pretty good job, IMO.

    At one point, they played a clip from Orr about his appointment:
    I've seen a lot of outrage over my appointment. I'm just wondering where that outrage was for the last 20 years...
    midgadjmeph
  • LincLinc Bard Detroit
    edited December 2014

    Bankruptcy is over. The Emergency Manager has resigned. Unemployment is dropping quickly. So is available office space downtown. Buildings are getting renovated left and right. The light rail is under construction. The Arena District broke ground. We have citywide curbside recycling now. And, Duggan is showing some spine.

    Every week we get an update on city services: http://www.detroitmi.gov/DetroitDashboard.aspx

    They are so far ahead of schedule on street light repairs that our neighborhood, slated for 2015, already has new LED lights on every corner.

    Of course, last night I was on the porch trying to pinpoint where the AK-47 gunfire came from. :D Some things take longer to change.

    GargmertesnCanti
  • LincLinc Bard Detroit
    edited December 2014

    A house down the street listed for $9,000 that's maybe 2/3 the size of ICHQ with no out building. It needs a full kitchen & bathroom renovation (maybe $30,000), but is otherwise move-in ready.

    The neighborhood Facebook group is placing bets on what it actually goes for. Most are in the $80,000 - $110,000 range - and this is for needing $30K of work! That's what pristine houses were selling for when I moved here. The theory is the real estate group selling it just did comparables within the zipcode to set the ask, not realizing how desirable Woodbridge is right now. Our two active Woodbridge property rehabbers both tapped out and said it was too rich for their blood.

    I commented and said, "That's kinda nuts, I bought a significantly larger home for $45K just 3 years ago. It needed a ton more work, but that's still a huge price disparity." One of the rehabbers replied: "Different times."

    Three years counts as a different era in Detroit right now.

    GargTushongeorgeh
  • Creeperbane2Creeperbane2 Victorian Scoundrel Indianapolis, IN
    edited December 2014

    I've never been there personally, but if it's anything like the rest of the Midwest expect freezing cold in the Winter and road construction any time else. #Midwestenproblems

Sign In or Register to comment.