I need a place to upload large video files.

SonorousSonorous F@H Fanatic US
edited March 2014 in Internet & Media

First, a little back story. I work for an AV company and we frequently shoot video for clients. The length and size all vary depending on the client needs. Some files can be as small as a few megabytes and some as large as 60 gigabytes. My issue lies with the larger files. I've tried setting up numerous cloud and FTP sites to enable me to get the content to the client. Most of the time the upload times don't fit with in my time constraints or the client ends up with a broken file some how. I have tried Dropbox, OwnCloud and an FTP. The later two were hosted form my personal Bluehost account. I'm seeing upload speeds of around 100-160kbp/s and for a file that's 30gigs, it's just too slow. I'm trying from both my home, which I get about 40Mbps up and from work where I get around 6-10 up. I'm not really sure if I am doing something wrong, or if what I am asking for is not possible. I just think my upload speeds are really low for the BW I have available to me. If I didn't include some info just let me know.

Side note: with owncloud I have tried uploading from the website, the desktop app and through WebDAV.

Comments

  • RyderRyder Kalamazoo, Mi

    As a point of reference, I have 5Mb/s up and I upload at around 330Kb/s. IMO, something is amiss there with your upload. Either on the ISP side or internally.
    I don't believe it can be related to the type of file you are uploading, are you zipping it first?

  • SonorousSonorous F@H Fanatic US

    @Ryder said:
    As a point of reference, I have 5Mb/s up and I upload at around 330Kb/s. IMO, something is amiss there with your upload. Either on the ISP side or internally.
    I don't believe it can be related to the type of file you are uploading, are you zipping it first?

    Due to the client base we have I'm not always able to archive the files. Some of these clients don't have the technical ability to deal with anything other than me emailing them a link and them double clicking to play media. Plus archiving some already heavily compressed media sometimes yields a filesize that's with in a few megs of the original.

    I totally agree with your assessment of my upload speed. I don't think I have to enable any port forwarding for any of these services. Unless I am completely mistaken. Maybe a call to the ISP is in order.

  • RyderRyder Kalamazoo, Mi

    I use Dropbox all the time, nothing special here for port forwarding on my router.
    I agree on the archive, it wasn't for the file size, just the file type. Maybe ISP "scans" or looks harder at things that are not zipped/archived? Some type of scan or speed limit on certain file types was the angle I was after.

  • SonorousSonorous F@H Fanatic US

    Well in that case I will defiantly try and zip them up. At this point I'm going to try anything to avoid driving all over Hampton Roads with thumb drives for clients.

  • SonorousSonorous F@H Fanatic US

    Just to show the difference in tested speed VS speed usable.

  • TushonTushon I'm scared, Coach Alexandria, VA

    As a test, you could try using 7zip or your archiving tool of choice to split the file into volumes of smaller sizes (say, 50MB) and then upload multiple at a time (preferably using an FTP client if that is your destination) and see if you get better speeds. That's not an ultimate fix, just to see if that's a potential issue on the ISP side.

  • RyderRyder Kalamazoo, Mi

    Have you tried uploading something other than video? Can you compress a directory of files, say 250MB or something and try an upload?

  • SonorousSonorous F@H Fanatic US
    edited March 2014

    @Tushon I'm trying to find comparable software for OSX, when I do I'll test that method.

    @Ryder Just tried with 100MB upload and got about 60-80KBps.

    EDIT: I'm seeing a trend where the speed sort of ramps up. It starts low, at about 10KBp/s and slowly gets faster over time. Similar to a torrent as you connect to more seeds. I've never seen that with an FTP.

  • TushonTushon I'm scared, Coach Alexandria, VA
    edited March 2014

    http://www.kekaosx.com/en/ is a more official port of 7zip to OSX

    https://filezilla-project.org/download.php?show_all=1 is an excellent, free FTP client

    edit: removed the initial page because keka is the best option as far as my random research said

  • SonorousSonorous F@H Fanatic US

    No change in speeds when using split zip files. I'll give my ISP a call and make sure they are giving me the full beans.

  • SonorousSonorous F@H Fanatic US
    edited March 2014

    So I've done so digging into the setup here at work. I have a Cisco DPC3010 with a part number of 4027668. According to the documentation it has 4 upstream channels but they aren't bonded. Would getting a modem that has a 8x4 bonded setup help increase my upload speed? Looking at http://www.cisco.com/c/dam/en/us/products/collateral/video/cable-modems-high-speed-data/7017296.pdf document for the modem I have, if the upstream modulation is QPSK or 16 QAM with a bandwidth of 1.6Mhz I'll see speeds similar to what I am getting. In the modem's about page accessed via the 192.169.100.1 address I see all 4 channels of upstream operating at power levels from 43.7 to 46.9dBmV. From I can tell that is nominal. This is all sort of new territory for me so I might be talking out of my ass. Those are the only stats I can give from the modem end.

  • I'd suggest opening an account with MaxCDN. It's one of the cheapest CDNs I know of, and I've always maxed my upload capability with them even with large video files. You can also try Amazon Web Services (s3/cloudfront), but it's a bit more expensive. CDNs generally are not limiting upload speeds, at least not at your max upload speeds. If you are still struggling to upload quickly to those services then I think that isolates the issue on your end.

    I can't comment on the cable modem situation, I don't know much about how they work. I would guess, however, that any docsis 3.0 modem should be able to upload faster than 1.5mbps.

    One last idea, are you allowed to compress the video files at all? A little tweak with ffmpeg can bring a 30gb file down to 3gb with out noticeable loss in quality.

  • SonorousSonorous F@H Fanatic US

    Thanks @PirateNinja, I'll look into those services. I think it's an ISP issue I am having though. I initially thought it was something to do with the services I was using. As for the file sizes, the client determines the output format of the video file. Sometimes I have to send a raw .mov file that's in the 40 to 50 gig range because the client wants the raw footage.

Sign In or Register to comment.