overclock core 2 duo 1.66 ghz cpu????

TrumandrummerTrumandrummer Taylor Michigan
edited November 2008 in Hardware
I really wanted to play crysis, on my dads laptop, hooked up to my 52" hdtv

his lappy is pretty good, not amazing but good. 3gb of ram, 8800 gts 512mb video memory, more than enough hdd.....

I ran a test on the crysis site "can you run it" his computer passed with high on everything, but failed only because the cpu speed is to slow....

( intel core 2 duo T5450, 1.66ghz ) :mad2:

could I overclock this?
I know nothing about overclocking ..... :shakehead

Comments

  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX
    edited October 2008
    Since it's a laptop, you can't easily do any overclocking on it.
  • TrumandrummerTrumandrummer Taylor Michigan
    edited October 2008
    hmmmmm, that sucks.....

    how about a new cpu, couldn't I get a core 2 duo 2.10 ghz off newegg and just install it in this?

    :confused:
  • CBCB Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ Der Millionendorf-
    edited October 2008
    You can't really do much to a laptop. You can usually upgrade the HD and the RAM, but beyond that the parts are proprietary.

    It's similar to asking about upgrading the processor in your XBox. Sure, it'd be technically possible, but nobody does it, and for good reason.
  • BuddyJBuddyJ Dept. of Propaganda OKC
    edited October 2008
    Oh a laptop, the CPU is usually soldered onto the board. It's not easily swapped.
  • TrumandrummerTrumandrummer Taylor Michigan
    edited October 2008
    thats sucks, really bad.... lol

    my P.O.S lappy passed the cpu test and failed everything else,
    my dads passed everything on high but the cpu test lol.

    so basically, im screwed?
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX
    edited October 2008
    Yes.
  • TrumandrummerTrumandrummer Taylor Michigan
    edited October 2008
    lol, well i guess its back to the ps3....
  • edited October 2008
    Download the demo and give it a whirl. You'll probably will need to knock it down to med settings but it is worth trying. Esp since it'll be free.
  • TrumandrummerTrumandrummer Taylor Michigan
    edited October 2008
    Wow,
    I downloaded the demo,
    the laptop actually runs it fine on high, at times of intense shooting, it gets laggy (obviously becuase of the cpu). With some of the settings on medium, and some on high, it runs with no problems....:D

    the game looks amazing on high.... cant even imagine "very high"

    thanks komete, I didn't even think about trying the demo.
  • edited October 2008
    Games are becoming much less CPU driven. With a 8800 gts, I had a feeling you'd be ok.
  • edited November 2008
    Buddy J wrote:
    Oh a laptop, the CPU is usually soldered onto the board. It's not easily swapped.

    It all depends on the laptop model. Some are soldered and some are socket processors. All the laptops I've ever bought had a socket type processor installed, so they were theoretically upgradable to a higher speed processor. But that is problematic too in that Intel has used several different socket designs even in the laptops of the last few years. I know that my E1705 can be upgraded to a T7600 from it's present T7400, but it's just not cost effective for a couple hundred MHz in my case. Now my Mac Mini uses a T5600, which is a 1.86 GHz Merom and I could also upgrade it to a T7600 (Mac Mini uses mobile procs). But I can't drop in a follow-on to the original Meroms because Intel changed the socket (socket M to socket P). :rolleyes2
  • TrumandrummerTrumandrummer Taylor Michigan
    edited November 2008
    hmm, this is pretty good news.....
    but how would I go about figuring out what it can support and what not?

    I guess I would have to find out if it is soldered first.
  • SnarkasmSnarkasm Madison, WI
    edited November 2008
    Or, since it plays the game fine, why bother voiding your warranty?
  • edited November 2008
    hmm, this is pretty good news.....
    but how would I go about figuring out what it can support and what not?

    I guess I would have to find out if it is soldered first.

    Your best bet would be to look up your make and model laptop and then hunt down the service manual for it. With Dell notebooks, their service manuals are pretty easy to find and download from their site, but I don't know about other companies service manuals. Then, look in the service manual and it might show whether the processor is directly soldered to the mobo or if it uses a socket. If you can't find a service manual for your notebook and you are the adventurous sort, you can try taking the notebook apart and checking whether the processor is socketed or soldered. But believe me, going without a service manual and tearing the machine down (especially if you have no previous experience working on notebooks) is not for the weak at heart. And if you do so, be sure to keep track of where each screw comes out of the case as a lot of them need a specific length screw in certain positions.

    Looking at the processor model number you posted in your first post (T5450) in Intel's processor spec finder, the only stepping they show for the T5450 is a socketed processor (Micro-FCPGA), which bodes well for an upgrade. However it doesn't show what socket that processor is designed for. So, it's time to look further to see what socket it uses.

    After googling around, I found a link to this Wikipedia page, where it shows the T5450 as using the socket P type socket. And that is good, because socket P processors are both easier to find and generally cheaper. One thing to check for before buying a replacement processor is that your present laptop is only using a 166 fsb speed processor and although the chipset it is using supports up to 200 fsb processors, you need to make sure the bios used by your laptop also supports 200 fsb processors too. You might be able to do that by checking documentation on your laptop's model and see what processors were offered or research around in some of the notebook forums and ask there. If it doesn't support 200 fsb processors it looks like the T5850 (2167 MHz) would be the fastest you can use. If your laptop can support the 200 fsb socket P processors, you should be able to go up to at least T7800 (2600 MHz) processor, by looking at the last link's page.
  • TrumandrummerTrumandrummer Taylor Michigan
    edited November 2008
    wow, that sounds like a lot of work..... lol

    Yea, I have never taken apart a notebook, its seems like it would be confusing. Although, im pretty good with tearing apart and re-assembling electronics.

    well I ran through the idea with my dad, telling him that it may or may not be possible... and why I wanted to do it and everything. He don't really understand any of it, and thinks its a dumb idea. Plus he bought the laptop from best buy and got the 3 year ext. warranty, and he doesn't want to void that.

    So, I guess its a "No Go" for me :sad2:

    but, thanks a lot for all your help muddocktor
    it was very informative. :smiles: I had no clue that your bios could also affect what cpus you can and cannot use.
  • edited November 2008
    Yeah, the bios also has to recognize the processor ID string that the proc returns to it or it might not boot or not run it at the proper speeds and voltages.

    I ran across this kind of problem recently on a desktop board myself. I was putting together a system with the Asus P5Q Pro mobo and I was waiting for the proc to come in, so I tried installing an old Celeron 326 I have. According to the Asus website that processor wasn't supported, but I figured I would try it anyways. I installed it but the board wouldn't boot. And I figure it's due to the board trying to boot it at a 200 fsb speed, which the minimum that P45 board will run and that old Celeron is a 133 fsb part.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited November 2008
    He don't really understand any of it, and thinks its a dumb idea. Plus he bought the laptop from best buy and got the 3 year ext. warranty, and he doesn't want to void that.
    If you are referring to overclocking the laptop, I think your dad is smart in this case. :) Break a desktop? Replace the part. Break a laptop? It can get complicated very fast.
  • TrumandrummerTrumandrummer Taylor Michigan
    edited November 2008
    Yea, thanks muddocktor, this is something ill keep in mind, in case I ever build my own computer. which I have been wanting to do for years.

    and that is a very good point Leonardo. :D
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