Shin Splints

SidekicksolSidekicksol Kansas City, Kansas
edited June 2009 in Fitness
Off topic, but i need help. Bad. They are horrid. I do high school soccer 5 nights a week, 2 conditioning, 1 half drilling half conditioning, 2 drilling, sometimes a scrimmage on the weekends. I cant take myself off long enough to ice them and treat them. What can i do? It hurts like nothing else.
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Comments

  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited March 2008
    You need to see a doctor.
  • SidekicksolSidekicksol Kansas City, Kansas
    edited March 2008
    saw the team therapist briefly... said i needed to take atleast 2 weeks off and ice. hell no.
  • GnomeQueenGnomeQueen The Lulz Queen Mountain Dew Mouth
    edited March 2008
    Go see a physical therapist.
  • CycloniteCyclonite Tampa, Florida
    edited March 2008
    saw the team therapist briefly... said i needed to take atleast 2 weeks off and ice. hell no.

    You ask a professional what to do... he gives you an answer... you decline to follow his advice. In turn, you present the same question to a bunch of people on a technical forum...

    Do you see where I'm going with this?
  • GnomeQueenGnomeQueen The Lulz Queen Mountain Dew Mouth
    edited March 2008
    Cyclonite wrote:
    You ask a professional what to do... he gives you an answer... you decline to follow his advice. In turn, you present the same question to a bunch of people on a technical forum...

    Do you see where I'm going with this?

    QFT. :D
  • ThraxThrax Professional Shill, Watch Slut, Mumble Hivemind Drone Austin, TX
    edited March 2008
    Wrap them as tightly as you possibly can in bandages. Good luck.
  • HarudathHarudath Great Britain
    edited March 2008
    Two weeks without sports and healthy legs again, or carry on doing what you want in excruciating pain... Toughie :skeptic:
  • SidekicksolSidekicksol Kansas City, Kansas
    edited March 2008
    this is kinda a last ditch thing. im not taking the 2 weeks off because to miss 2 weeks now would be to miss 3 games out of the freshly started season, something i dont think i could afford to miss. the coach knows i have them, so i guess its just until he forces me to sit out that ill try to play. being stubborn runs in my family >.<
  • HarudathHarudath Great Britain
    edited March 2008
    You can get some muscle rub, my brother uses it, just ask a doctor for some
  • Your-Amish-DaddyYour-Amish-Daddy The heart of Texas
    edited March 2008
    Icy hot might work, but what you might wanna do is get some shin guards and pad the back of them. Bulk cotton (Cotton balls in a pinch) might just be that extra bit of pressure resistance you need. I say this because I bet most of the pain you're getting is from stopping the ball.
  • SidekicksolSidekicksol Kansas City, Kansas
    edited March 2008
    its mostly running that hurts. im a striker at a 12441 formation so everything i do is running and shooting. i will try to pad the back of them, i hadnt thought of it! rub, icy hot, i have used them a little bit but not much. ill go get some more when i can. ty for the advice!
  • mmonninmmonnin Centreville, VA
    edited March 2008
    Nothing you really can do. Run through it, at least you are on grass so it cant be that bad. I had them from Frosh track to Senior CC so several years. Only until senior track season did I finally not have shin splits anymore.

    Stand with your heals on a curb and do toe raises to strennthen the muscels on the front of your shins.

    And 2 weeks with no running will not get rid of shin splits.
  • HarudathHarudath Great Britain
    edited March 2008
    Surely it'll reduce the pain?
  • mmonninmmonnin Centreville, VA
    edited March 2008
    It just doesn't go away that easy. I didnt run during the winter(I was in wrestling) and for part of the summer but I still had them for years. For me it was bad enough that pressure to the outside of the shin caused pain. There was constant swelling. Proper stretching and strengthening the muscle on the shin is the best way to help, along with good shoes.
  • edited March 2008
    Sounds goofy, but I'm a long distance runner and this helps me....walk backwards on a treadmill with no incline on it for about a quarter of a mile when you are done for the day. I know it sounds dumb but has always helped me. Also make sure to ice nightly and use icy hot when you go to bed.
  • mmonninmmonnin Centreville, VA
    edited March 2008
    Another way to strengthen the shin muscle?

    You could consciously make an effort to lift your toe when walking and land(roll) on your heal. This really uses the shin muscle.
  • SidekicksolSidekicksol Kansas City, Kansas
    edited March 2008
    so try to work shin muscles? i can see why it wouldnt go away that easy, correct me if im wrong, but its bruising between the bone and skin. if its really that big of a bruise, imm sure your right 2 weeks wont nearly cut it. thank you all for the advice! one last question, are there any stretches that may help other than toe raises?
  • MiracleManSMiracleManS Chambersburg, PA
    edited March 2008
    Having run 4 years of college track and having any of a wide array of shin problems, my suggestion to you is something we started doing my Freshman year: Contrast baths. This isn't something that will immediately help with reduction of pain, but it will lessen and reduce the amount of pain and swelling for about half an hour.

    This should only be used AFTER a practice or workout (especially one that is particularly painful or before a contest) and at most ONE TO TWO TIMES A WEEK!

    (These procedures assume you have access to 2 whirlpools [best option] or 2 tubs [if whirlpools aren't an option] of some sort.)

    1) Fill two pools, one with hot water (100 degrees+ is best) and cold water (Cold, really cold, like 45-50 degrees cold. The bigger the "contrast" the more this is going to help in the end.)
    2) Start in the cold bath for 1 minute. This is going to feel very, very cold and sting quite a bit. Try not to hyperventilate etc.
    3) After 30 seconds IMMEDIATELY switch to the hot bath for 30 seconds. This may sting and be slightly uncomfortable.
    4) After that, skip back to the cold whirlpool again for 1 minute.
    5) Do this rotation a total of 3 times ENDING ON THE COLD WATER! This is important as it is meant to keep the swelling down.


    The big thing about a contrast bath is that it alerts the body part that something is wrong, the drastic changes in temperature cause blood to flow in and out very, very fast. Meaning you'll get a rush of nutrients to the offended area and ending on cold will reduce the swelling/inflammation and the pain (it should feel as if you have absolutely WONDERFUL legs after doing this, no pain from anything. Mine always felt remarkably fresh afterward.). After about 2 weeks of this you should notice some decrease in the pain. It is important that you TAKE CARE OF YOUR SHINS as has been said here. The best thing to do is to stretch them. Here's some visuals to help with the stretches. And remember, if it gets TOO BAD YOU NEED TO STOP. Stress fractures suck, I speak from experience and seeing people with them.
  • SidekicksolSidekicksol Kansas City, Kansas
    edited March 2008
    tyvm miracleman! this is why i love icrontic, people take vast amounts of time just to help others! i had never heard of these^^. i have access to 2 bathes and i will try this. saturday i believe i have a game so i should try this after thursday or friday practice?
  • MiracleManSMiracleManS Chambersburg, PA
    edited March 2008
    Yes, that is usually the best time for this kind of stuff. If you can limit it to Thursday as Friday should be a fairly easy day for you (from what I know about common practice etiquette). If you can survive it, limit it to once a week too.
  • SPIKE09SPIKE09 Scatland
    edited March 2008
    1) Fill two pools, one with hot water (100 degrees+ is best)
    Damn hope you mean Fahrenheit MM otherwise call the burns clinic prior to immersion sidekicksol. I've only suffered shin splints once did a marathon without training proerly and it was painful for at least 4 months after when playing rugby. i used either electrical insulating tape or zinc oxide plaster to support it one line of tape either side of the shin and a pair of strips of tape top and bottom to secure it.
  • SidekicksolSidekicksol Kansas City, Kansas
    edited March 2008
    ive had them for about 1 year and a half now, ever since i moved up to striker....
  • MiracleManSMiracleManS Chambersburg, PA
    edited March 2008
    If that's the case, I'd make sure and wrap them as has been suggested. Sucks when you're pulling it off and leg hair is attached, but in the long run it will keep pain and swelling down and make them manageable.


    Edit: and yes, IM TALKING FARENHEIT!!! I'm terrible, terrible at remembering there are some people who use good systems of measure on these boards.
  • SidekicksolSidekicksol Kansas City, Kansas
    edited March 2008
    wrap em, got it : )
  • QeldromaQeldroma Arid ZoneAh
    edited March 2008
    I also was a soccer player and got these early in my training. They are common to those who are working up from being out of shape and are integrating sprints into their training.

    I had them bad my first game and basically was no good to the team until they were gone. If it is competitive and the suggestions don't work, you are doing them or yourself no favors by playing flat- stay out. It's a compounding problem so train for circulation and not high impact.

    It was over a month before I could turn it on- sorry. I can only hope it goes quicker for you.
  • LawnMMLawnMM Colorado
    edited March 2008
    Good set of shoes helps a lot. I used to get them somewhat frequently. Finally bought a good pair of Brooks running shoes and haven't had them since. Sounds like you are overtraining to me. The pain isn't going to go away without rest.
  • LeonardoLeonardo Wake up and smell the glaciers Eagle River, Alaska
    edited March 2008
    About the 18th year into my Army career I started getting shin splints from running. (LOTS of running in the Army.) Fortunately for me, it wasn't severe. Usually a new pair of high quality running shoes did the fix. I can't address severe shin splints.

    Do you run outside of your formal soccer training? And if yes, is that running on paved surfaces? Don't run on asphalt or concrete. It is hell on the skeleton and joints.
  • SidekicksolSidekicksol Kansas City, Kansas
    edited March 2008
    i do on breaks from soccer, but other than that no. there is no need to with all the practice. when i do, i run on a track surface, not sure of the composition but it is definetly not concrete or asphalt. as far as running shoes, im forced to wear cleats because it usually transfers straight from drills to running. i do have 120$ 90's for cleats, which are decent.
  • MiracleManSMiracleManS Chambersburg, PA
    edited March 2008
    How's the practice surface? Is it hard and dry? That could be part of your problem. There's also the question of running form included, but that's usually less of a concern. Depending on your cleats might show whats up with your shins. Could you provide us with some sort of information on them so we could look them up? I know I bought a really nice pair of running shoes once that made my shins feel like they were ripping apart. I tried inserts and that helped, but eventually I just changed shoes and the problem subsided to normal track athlete running pain.

    Anecdotally, I can attest to the working of wrapping, contrast baths, and stretching at subduing shin splint pain. I had them so bad my sophomore year of high school I couldn't walk in practice much less run (I persisted) but on race days I had enough adrenaline that it wasn't an issue. That said, if I had it to do over again, I'd have taken a break to increase the likely hood of peak performance. They persisted until my sprint coach insisted that I do the bathing and stretching. I still had pain but it was more than manageable without taking pain killers.

    As an aside: There's a misconception about shin splints that they can "get better" or they'll "go away". That isn't the case. As an injury shin splints are with you for life. It's just a question of how inflamed and/or sore they can get. Once you pull that muscle away from the tibia you're SOL as far as reconnecting. That doesn't mean its not treatable and/or going to always be painful. The fact of the matter is that with proper therapy and attention it should never be a problem unless you're over-training.
  • SidekicksolSidekicksol Kansas City, Kansas
    edited March 2008
    its somewhat soft and.. spring like? im not sure how to describe it. it absorbs the impact of your foot hitting it though.
    off to practice in 10 minutes.
    EDIT: one sec on the cleat info
    EDIT2: http://www.soccercorner.com/Nike-Air-Zoom-Total-90-Supremacy-FG-p/sm-ni313969-601.htm
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