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Tales of Monkey Island Chapter 5: The Rise of The Pirate God review

Tales of Monkey Island Chapter 5: The Rise of The Pirate God review

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If you haven’t yet checked out Tales of Monkey Island, you should. The first episode is now available for free, and if that doesn’t convince you, check out my reviews of the first four chapters. It’s a series worth your time, and now that the 5th and final chapter has dropped, you can probably expect some package pricing soon. With the exception of Chapter 3, which was “merely” very good, all five chapters are tremendously entertaining.

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This finale is the best episode of the season, and is certainly worth the wait. Guybrush Threepwood has finally learned the truth about who has been behind the trials of his life leading up to this point. The story is at its climax—the characters here are more dynamic and interesting, the puzzles are more clever, and the situations are more ridiculous, while at the same time becoming serious and evocative.

In this chapter (spoilers ahead for those who haven’t finished Chapter 4), Guybrush needs to escape from the Crossroads of the Pirate afterlife. He starts the chapter as a ghost on the shores of the River Styx. His first task is to find two gold coins for the ferryman. Meanwhile, his wife is stuck on LeChuck’s ship, forced to watch him try to use the poor monkeys of the Caribbean to open the portal to the Crossroads. Guybrush will have to interact with the three pirate heavens (treasure-hunting, sword-fighting, and thieving) and outsmart the guardian of each to escape back into the mortal realm. Just to make it more complicated, Guybrush must figure out if the Voodoo Lady can be trusted—after trusting her his whole life.

Hopefully, this is the only the first season of Tales of Monkey Island, and from the epilogue, it looks like they have plans for much more Monkey Island to come. The episodic format works really well for this type of adventure game, delivering just the right amount of story to satiate a serious gamer, while not overwhelming a casual gamer. Whatever their plans, I look forward to the release of more adventures like these from Telltale Games.

Comments

  1. Cliff_Forster
    Cliff_Forster ""If you haven’t yet checked out Tales of Monkey Island, you should""

    I have, and it sucks. Point and click is a painfully dated genre. It holds nothing of value for the current gaming landscape. It is slow, it is boring, its only value is to promote nostalgia and insult the players intelligence with inane puzzles. If I wanted to do that I would just fire up the emulator and play the old titles.

    Don't get me wrong, point and click once had a place in my heart. I loved Maniac Mansion and to this day defend it as one of the most unappreciated titles of its time. I played Myst, enjoyed it at the time. Today though, after tasting the sweet nectar of innovation, it is impossible for me to go back to a lazy, poorly implemented gameplay model that only existed because of the technological limitations of the time.

    Perhaps for their next trick, they will revive Zork text adventures?
  2. ardichoke
    ardichoke There might be some good money in that. I knew quite a few people in college that enjoyed MUDing.
  3. CB
    CB I would absolutely love for someone to revive Zork with modern graphics and music.
  4. Snarkasm
    Snarkasm
    Cliff_Forster said:
    Board gaming is a painfully dated genre. It holds nothing of value for the current gaming landscape. It is slow, it is boring, its only value is to promote nostalgia and insult the players intelligence with inane puzzles. If I wanted to do that I would just bust out Chutes and Ladders and play the old titles.

    Don't get me wrong, board gaming once had a place in my heart. I loved chess and to this day defend it as one of the most unappreciated titles of its time. I played checkers, enjoyed it at the time. Today though, after tasting the sweet nectar of innovation, it is impossible for me to go back to a lazy, poorly implemented gameplay model that only existed because of the technological limitations of the time.
    Some people like puzzle games, like thinking about their next move, like figuring out something clever. Perhaps the problem is players' attention spans or mental capacity and not with game models that have served billions of players for ages.
  5. kryyst
    kryyst I love puzzle games of this nature. But I actually agree with Cliff in this one Monkey Island was great fun, originally. Playing through it now feels dated and quiet painful. There are simply better games a similar nature that create a more seemless experience and more interesting puzzles. For example the Professor Layton series on the NDS is similar but far superior.

    Monkey island is only fit for nostalgia. It's interesting for what it was, not what it is. In the same way that games like Leather Goddess of Phobos is no longer relevant.

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